lawrence welk show cast deaths (2022)

lawrence welk show cast deaths (1)

The Lawrence Welk show had a large cast with musicians, singers, and dancers. A short list of cast members who have died would include Lawrence Welk, his musical director, George Cates, singer Natalie Nevins, singer Joe Feeney, singer Jimmy Roberts, Champagne Ladies Nora Zimmer and Alice Lon, and many band members.

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lawrence welk show cast deaths (2)

The Lawrence Welk Show cast list, including photos of the actors when available. This list includes all of the The Lawrence Welk Show main actors and actresses, so if they are an integral part of the show you'll find them below.You can various bits of trivia about these The Lawrence Welk Show stars, such as where the actor was born and what their year of birth is.

  • lawrence welk show cast deaths (3)1

    Aladdin was an actor and a musician. ...more

  • lawrence welk show cast deaths (4)2

    Alice Lon Wyche (November 23, 1926 – April 24, 1981), known as Alice Lon, was an American singer and dancer on The Lawrence Welk Show during its early years on network television. ...more

  • lawrence welk show cast deaths (5)3

    Arthur Duncan (born September 25, 1933) is an American tap dancer, known for his stint as a performer on The Lawrence Welk Show from 1964 to 1982, which made him the first African-American regular on ...more

  • lawrence welk show cast deaths (6)4

    Ava Marlene Barber (born June 28, 1954) is an American country music singer and performer. She is best remembered for her performances on The Lawrence Welk Show throughout much of the 1970s and early ...more

  • lawrence welk show cast deaths (7)5

    Barbara Boylan (born (1942-08-12) August 12, 1942 in Long Beach, California) is an American dancer and former television personality who was featured on The Lawrence Welk Show from 1961 to 1967, and ...more

  • lawrence welk show cast deaths (8)6

    The Mickey Mouse Club, The Lawrence Welk Show

    Robert Wilkie "Bobby" Burgess (born May 19, 1941, Long Beach, California) is an American dancer and singer. He was one of the original Mouseketeers. Later, he was a regular on The Lawrence Welk Show. ...more

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    Robert Havens (born May 3, 1930) is an American big band and jazz musician who appeared on The Lawrence Welk Show from 1960 to 1982. His instrument is the trombone.Born to a musical family in Quincy, ...more

  • lawrence welk show cast deaths (10)8

    Robert Lido (September 21, 1914 – August 9, 2000) was an American musician and singer who was a regular member of television's The Lawrence Welk Show. His instrument was the violin. Born in Jersey ...more

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    Robert Howard Ralston (born July 2, 1938, in Upland, California) is an American pianist and organist who performed on television's The Lawrence Welk Show from 1963 until 1982, when the series ended. ...more

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    Charlotte Harris is an American musician. ...more

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    Claire Yvonne King (born January 3, 1946) professionally Cissy King, is an American-born singer and dancer best known as a featured performer on The Lawrence Welk Show television program.King was ...more

  • lawrence welk show cast deaths (14)12

    Clay Hart (born July 1, 1942) is an American country music singer and guitarist who was a member of The Lawrence Welk Show television program from 1969 to 1975. ...more

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    Richard L. Dale (September 14, 1926 – December 26, 2014) was an American singer and musician, best known as a featured singer and saxophone player on the television variety show The Lawrence Welk ...more

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  • lawrence welk show cast deaths (17)15

    Gail Farrell (born October 6, 1947) is an American singer and songwriter, best known for her work on the variety program The Lawrence Welk Show. ...more

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    The Lawrence Welk Show, Showcase '68

    Guy Lee Hovis, Jr. (born September 24, 1941), is an American singer, who, along with his former wife, Ralna English, a native of West Texas, was one of the featured acts of the ABC and syndicated ...more

  • lawrence welk show cast deaths (19)17

    Henry Falcon Cuesta, Sr. (December 23, 1931 – December 17, 2003), was an American woodwind musician who was a cast member of The Lawrence Welk Show. His primary instrument was the clarinet, but he ...more

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    Prince Planet, The Lawrence Welk Show

    Jerry Burke (July 26, 1911 – February 13, 1965) was a musician who played the organ and piano for the Lawrence Welk orchestra from 1934 to 1965. ...more

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    Jimmy Roberts (April 6, 1923 – February 6, 1999) was an American tenor singer. He was a featured performer on the TV variety program The Lawrence Welk Show during its entire broadcast run from 1955 ...more

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    Joe Feeney (August 15, 1931 – April 16, 2008) was an American tenor singer who was a member of The Lawrence Welk Show television program. ...more

  • lawrence welk show cast deaths (23)21

    Johnathan Zell (born November 24, 1947) is an American musician, best known as a trumpeter from The Lawrence Welk Show, a musical, variety-show television series. ...more

  • lawrence welk show cast deaths (24)22

    Jo Ann Castle (born September 3, 1939) is an American honky-tonk pianist, best remembered for appearing on The Lawrence Welk Show. She adopted her stage name from the name of an accordion ...more

  • lawrence welk show cast deaths (25)23

    Kathie Sullivan (born May 31, 1953) is an American-born singer who appeared on television's The Lawrence Welk Show from 1976 to 1982. ...more

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    The Lawrence Welk Show, The Delo And Daly Show

    Kenneth Edward Delo (December 8, 1938 – February 8, 2016) was an American singer best known as a member of television's The Lawrence Welk Show.Born and reared in River Rouge, Michigan, Delo started ...more

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    Lawrence "Bullfrog" Hooper (July 22, 1917 in Independence, Missouri – June 10, 1983 in Los Angeles, California) was an American musician and vocalist. He was best known to television audiences as ...more

lawrence welk show cast deaths (28)

The Lawrence Welk Show cast list, including photos of the actors when available. Lawrence Welk (March 11, 1903 â May 17, 1992) was an American musician, accordionist, bandleader, and television impresario, who hosted the television program The Lawrence Welk Show from 1951 to 1982. Bobby was very friendly, wholesome, dedicated to his dancing.

lawrence welk show cast deaths (29)

Singer was featured on the hit show for 25 years Joe Feeney, a Nebraska-born tenor who crooned "Danny Boy" and other standards for 25 years on "The Lawrence Welk Show… His style came to be known to his large audience of radio, television, and live-performance fans (and critics) as "champagne music". The Lawrence Welk Show did try to change with the times. Indeed, many Welk performers married other Welk performers, and after a time, the whole show seemed to occupy an alternate universe from the increasingly youth-heavy Los Angeles it was taped in. Over 100 biographies from the Lawrence Welk Show. At the Champagne Theatre in Branson, Missouri, 47 alumnae of The Lawrence Welk Show (1955) reunite for an evening of song and dance. Quotation: "And a-one, and a-two." The Lawrence Welk Show is available for streaming on American Pop … Welk fired Alice Lon, the original Champagne Lady, in 1959--on-air--for crossing her legs on a desk during a number. After Elsie Hobson died in 2001, James met actress, singer and writer Ashley Aarons. 1931–1992 his death). He was 69. How they got hired, why they got fired, why they left, where they are now.Singers, dancers and band biographies. The Lawrence Welk Show (1955–1982) Series Cast & Crew. 5/17/1992 Age: 89 Cause of death: pneumonia Full name: Lawrence Welk ... pomoc.nvitamin.si With Daphne Zuniga, Sheila Aldridge, Sherry Aldridge, Ron Anderson. He also hosted two of the weekly Welk show rebroadcasts on PBS, which feature new 10- to 12-minute segments wrapped around the old programs. Lawrence Welk (March 11, 1903 – May 17, 1992) was an American musician, accordionist, Welk collaborated with Western artist Red Foley to record a version of Spade Cooley's "Shame on You" in 1945. hit "The Wah-Watusi" with the bass singer Larry Hooper wearing a beatnik outfit. Musical Performers Solo artists and groups, singers and instrumentalists, from a variety of genres. Lawrence Welk Dead Born: 3/11/1903 in Strasburg, North Dakota, USA Died: 5/17/1992 Age: 89 Cause of death: pneumonia Full name: Lawrence Welk Noted For: accordianist, bandleader, host, "The Lawrence Welk Show" (1955-82). He was featured weekly on dixieland and big band numbers, often in the company of Bob Havens (trombone), Don Bonnee or Mahlon Clark (clarinet), Russ Klein (tenor) and Frank Scott (piano). THE CHAMPAGNE MUSIC MAKERS: LAWRENCE WELK bandleader and host was born in Strasburg, North Dakota on March 11, 1903. Larry Hooper died of TEENney failure in 1983. This list includes all of the The Lawrence Welk Show main actors and actresses, so if they are an integral part of the show you'll find them below.You can various bits of trivia about these The Lawrence Welk Show stars, such as where the actor was born and what their year of birth is. Welk's 'champagne music' made for one of TV's most beloved series, first running on ABC from 1955 to 1971, then bubbling along in syndication until 1982. The "Stars of the Lawrence Welk Show" appeared there. Children, 3. Lawrence Welk Female Singers . In 1962, Cathcart joined the Lawrence Welk show. Lawrence Welk Net Worth: Lawrence Welk was an American musician, bandleader, and television personality who had a net worth of $8 million. The Lawrence Welk Show cast list, including photos of the actors when available. If we get started on the … Lawrence Welk's Son's Death . Bobby Burgess performs with all three of his dancing partners, Barbara Boylan, Cissy King and Elaine Balden. Lawrence Welk Deceased Cast Members The Lawrence Welk show had a large cast with musicians, singers, and dancers. 1931–1992 his death). Beginning in 1946, he began doing a lot of session work with Bing Crosby including appearances on his TV show. ABC put "The Lawrence Welk Show" on the air July 2, 1955. list deceased members of lawrence welk show. He accused her of "showing too much knee" and said he didn't tolerate "cheesecake" on his show. Lawrence Welk Show Cast. Athletes & Sports Figures And Tom stood out. The Lawrence Welk Show: Ava Barber, Lynn Anderson, Norma Zimmer, Lawrence Welk, Joe Feeney, Tom Netherton, Guy Hovis, Bobby Burgess The real story behind Cissy King and Natalie Nevins leaving the Show. TV show casts and stars of the silver screen. In recent years, Cuesta was one of the most popular of the featured performers at the Welk Resorts in Branson, Mo., and San Diego, and for the past few years he toured with "The Live Lawrence Welk Show." Complete song listing of Lawrence Welk on OLDIES.com Lawrence Welk ~ Songs List | OLDIES.com COVID-19: Because of processes designed to ensure the safety of our employees, you may experience a delay in the shipping of your order. Dick Cathcart, who provided the trumpet riffs for the 1955 film "Pete Kelly's Blues" and later played with the "Lawrence Welk Show" band, died on Monday. Lawrence Welk Cast Who Have Died . Aug 6, 2016. In 1951, Welk settled in Los Angeles. Where do I stream The Lawrence Welk Show online? Lawrence Welk Wikipedia 2020. Lawrence Welk Biography. She was often referred to as "Queen of the Honky-Tonk Piano" by Lawrence Welk himself. I got friendly with Cissy, Bobby and Tom. Over 60 years on TV! Welk was best known for hosting The Lawrence Welk Show from 1951 to 1982. The show became a Saturday night institution for many Americans. Our most popular category! Lawrence Welk Cast Still Living . Deceased Members Lawrence Welk Show . Children, 3. Jan 27, 2013 - SECOND PAGE TO WUNNERFUL PAST Sally Flynn and Clay Hart Lawrence Welk (March 11, 1903 – May 17, 1992) was an American musician, accordionist, One of his sons, Lawrence Welk Jr., married fellow Lawrence Welk Show performer Tanya Falan; they later This list includes all of the The Lawrence Welk Show main actors and actresses, so if they are an integral part of the show you'll find them below.You can various bits of trivia about these The Lawrence Welk Show stars, such as where the actor was born and what their year of birth is. Lawrence Welk Cast Death List . Interviews with living members. In watching all the re-runs of Lawrence Welk I appreciate that show a whole lot more then i did in my teens and early 20's. The series first aired on July 2, 1955. Lawrence Welk Members Passed Away . Political Figures U.S. Presidents, Cabinet, Congress, Supreme Court, state & local, world. Here is a Project I just set up for Lawrence Welk and his performers to help organize our search.. Should we focus on deceased stars or are living cast members famous enough. The group became an instant sensation, and Welk booked them as regulars on his show, where they performed every Saturday night for more than 13 years. The Lawrence Welk Show is a series that is currently running and has 1 seasons (22 episodes). Jo Ann Castle (born September 3, 1939) is an American honky-tonk pianist, best remembered for appearing on The Lawrence Welk Show. Myron Floren, Guy & Ralna (kept to themselves), Cissy King and Bobby Burgess and Tom Netherton. Lawrence Welk Deceased Cast Members. He became director of "The Lawrence Welk Show" in 1955 and in 1962 became the producer/director of the Welk show until his retirement in 1986. The Lawrence Welk Show Cast List … The Lennon Sisters, a harmonic quartet of siblings, made their debut appearance on "The Lawrence Welk Show" on Dec. 24, 1955, with an a cappella version of the song "He." A massive fan campaign ensued to bring her back; Welk … Directed by Dennis Glore. Ratings started low the first week, but quickly zoomed upwards. They were great. PBS Show Information. Lawrence Welk was on TV from 1955 to 1982 plus a lot of specials afterwards PBS once or twice a week. The Lawrence Welk Show cast list, including photos of the actors when available. Lawrence Welk (March 11, 1903 – May 17, 1992) was an American musician, accordionist, bandleader, and television impresario, who hosted the television program The Lawrence Welk Show from 1951 to 1982. Bobby was very friendly, wholesome, dedicated to his dancing. Lawrence Welk was born in Strasburg, North Dakota in March 1903 and passed away in May 1992. The Lawrence Welk Show (TV Series 1955–1982) cast and crew credits, including actors, actresses, directors, writers and more. Directed by (4) Writing credits (1) Cast (353) Produced by (10) Cinematography by (2) Film Editing by (4) Art Direction by (7) Set Decoration by (1) Costume Design by (1) Makeup Department (13) Production Management (13)

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More FAQs for lawrence welk show cast deaths

(Video) The Death of Lawrence Welk as reported on The Lawrence Welk Show
  • Who has died from Lawrence Welk show?

    Norma Zimmer, the “Champagne Lady” of TV’s “The Lawrence Welk Show” and a studio singer who worked with Frank Sinatra and other pop stars, has died. She was 87. Ms. Zimmer died Tuesday at her home in Brea (Orange County), Welk’s son, Larry, said Wednesday. Is Tom Netherton still alive?

    What happened to Tom Netherton from Lawrence Welk?

  • How many of Lawrence Welk cast members have died?

    list deceased members of lawrence welk show (Feb 17, 2022) After Elsie Hobson died in 2001, James met actress, singer and writer Ashley Aarons. The Lawrence Welk Show: Ava Barber, Lynn Anderson,

    Tom Netherton is dead

  • Who is still alive from the Laurance Welk show?

    Richard L. Dale (September 14, 1926 – December 26, 2014) was an American singer and musician, best known as a featured singer and saxophone player on the television variety show The Lawrence Welk Show . A native of Algona, Iowa, he served in the United States Navy during World War II after graduation from Algona High School.

    Is Lawrence Welk Jr Still Alive?

  • Are Lawrence Welks children still alive?

    Are Lawrence Welk's children still alive? A Loving Family Fern is survived by three children, Shirley and Bob Fredricks, Donna Mack and Larry and Lynn Welk; 11 grandchildren, Laura and Jeff Segall, Dr. Is Lawrence Welk Jr still alive? Welk completely retired from all public appearances in 1992 at the age of 89. ...

    Are Lawrence Welk's children still alive?

    Is Lawrence Welk Jr still alive?

    Are the Lennon Sisters Mormon?

    Is Mary Lou Metzger still married?

    When did Lawrence Welk die?

    What happened to Guy and Ralna?

    Who is Lawrence Welk's daughter in law?

    When was the last Lawrence Welk Show?

    What is Lawrence Welk's nationality?

    Why did Guy and Ralna Hovis divorce?

    Is ralna English married now?

    Are the Lennon sisters married?

    Who did Peggy Lennon marry?

    Who is Lawrence Welk Jr married to?

lawrence welk show cast deaths (30)

Welk fired Alice Lon, the original Champagne Lady, in 1959--on-air--for crossing her legs on a desk during a number. He accused her of "showing too much knee" and said he didn't tolerate "cheesecake" on his show. A massive fan campaign ensued to bring her back; Welk finally relented, but she said no. Offsite Link.

I heard a rumor once about Arthur Duncan.

Just not Myron Floren, please.

Tom Netherton. Bobby is straight but bubbly. Jo Ann Castle, a real horn dog!

Bobby married and had children and they are still together. He does not identify as gay.

Offsite Link

Myron is straight and a real skirt chaser...into chicken

I think Tom Netherton is straight. He tried to pick me up years ago at Harrah's Lake Tahoe.

Tom Netherton was (is?) So Very Gay that Lawrence Welk himself could not refrain from making a bitchy observation that Tom was "a big hit, and NOT JUST WIT' THE LADIES." I actually saw this on PBS and the BF and I laughed our asses off. What an evil old cunt Welk was.

Tank you, tank you. Now the lovely Bobby and Cissy. To av-Oyd any Con-fus-ion, Cissy is the one wearin' the dress.

I've heard that Lawrence played out his "master-servant" fantasy by fucking Arthur Duncan after every show.

Who is Lawrence Welk? Was this some 80's show that most of us were to young to remember?

[quote]Was this some 80's show that most of us were to young to remember?

Oh, dear.

Was Tom the bleached blond guy? If so, he's the guy who had the affair with Kathie Lee's first husband (the christian record producer).

R7= biggest liar in America!

I used to see Norma Zimmer at Crazy Nanny's.

Norma Zimmer loved the man-sex. She used to visit gay baths in NYC and cheer on the men, especially those who were engaged in group sex. Actually, she was the only woman who I ever saw at the baths.

(Video) Lynn Anderson: News Report of Her Death - July 30, 2015

If we asked, she would always sing. She always said that she thought Bette Midler was a vulgar slut who only would do anything for money. Norma, unlike Bette, was a true friend of the gays.

Believe me, I often heard Norma crooning as I was being penetrated, even double-penetrated, by many hot guys.

Birmingham was a city so starved for Culture in the '80s that there was great hubbub and gossip when Norma broke a bone after being thrown from a horse on the ranch of some rich friends of hers south of town.

Tom Netherton was very handsome in a wholesome kind of way, but his singing defined bland.

I have a copy of his autobiography which I think was written about 30 years ago, and he says that he loves women but that he hadn't found the right girl yet.

I guess we can all do the math.

I knew as a kid that Tom Netherton was a big old 'mo. That perfect laquered hair. The way he moved his mouth when he sang those cheesy songs. He was a total cheeseball PARODY of himself and the clown didn't even know it. He was an SNL skit character. He was just SO in love with the sound of his own treacly voice. He was a sitcom character. Handsome, yes. But THE ultimate example of a cheesy 70's/80's closet case. I have met a hundred of them throughout my life, usually doing musical theatre.

Tom has accepted Christ, so he can't possibly be gay.

Check this out at your peril.

Offsite Link

And what would have happened to that sissy Bobby if he had come out of the closet? Would he still have been on the show? Methinks not. Get him married to cover up.

Tom putting the nethie into Netherton.

Offsite Link

They experimented with hip in the late 60's.

Offsite Link

Experimented, yes; succeeded ... well ...

Offsite Link

Wowza, that's some website R20! So Tom Netherton lives near me in VA now? I feel like a DL road-trip might be in order. He doesn't have anything on his upcoming calendar, but we can hope.

Tom couldn't hide it but on the other hand, maybe no one told him? I know he belonged to some religious cult when he was young so I think he believed being gay was a sin.

As I said, he belonged to a religious cult. They all lived together like a family and they farmed and did whatever other shit they could do to make a living. Anyway...wish someone had told the guy he was gay. I hope that he has given into his urges and had a few boyfriend ot two.

R13

WTH? Kathie Lee's first hubby had a fling with a man ??

I must have been living under a rock to have missed this.

Tell me more.

Myron's been playing the Accordion in the Sky since 2005 where he joined their band at 85.

I always wondered what Norma Zimmer had to do in order to hold the title of Champagne Lady.

Tom Netherton used to sweat so much on the show that I'm surprised he didn't get electrocuted by the microphone. He was also the only performer on the show that I ever saw go up on his lyrics (ironically, it was "Young at Heart" which begins, "Fairy tales can come true..." and then he froze and went, "buh-buh-buh-buh." He forgot more lyrics later in the song. Kathie Lee outed him in her autobiography when she wrote about her first husband, who was gay and "lived with a gay performer on the Lawrence Welk Show."

I don't know if there were any other gays on the show, but piano player Bob Ralston was married to the harshest looking Dutch lady you ever saw. He later went to prison for molesting one of his young male piano students, but he's out of prison now and apparently nobody on the show holds it against him, as he frequently appears on Welk reunion specials.

If you watch the PBS rebroadcasts and reunion shows, it's a little sad to see these performers today. They were famous for the brief time they appeared on the show and now have to base their entire careers on their status as a "former Welk star" as they appear on cruise ships, small nightclubs, etc. And they are all trying to find ways to make more money. Ken Delo sells hypnosis tapes and a self-published novel; the Lennons sell dolls; Ava Barber opened a sandwich shop, etc., etc.

More of Tom and a few others.

Offsite Link

OMG, that link. I am crying with laughter as I type! Tom Netherton is gayer than a tree full of parrots on Liberace's lanai.

And I am going to adopt the name "Inese's mother, Tusnelda" as my DL monicker from now on. With names like that, those two just HAVE to be Mormons from Utah.

R31, that's some good dirt on Bob Ralston—[italic]ewww[/italic]!

Boy, Tusnelda's got it bad!

Joe Feeney. But I can't talk about it.

Guy of Guy and Ralna got remarried—that sinner! Believe it or not, I think he and Ralna still perform together on occasion. Their divorce was something of a scandal, as they were Sonny and Cher for squares.

Offsite Link

I just discovered Ken Delo and had a little crush on him until I went to his website and saw him now. Father Time is a bastard.

Natalie Nevins did have a strange, piggy-looking nose. Didn't she have some kind of breakdown that forced her to quit the show?

Charlotte could really wrap her legs around that cello.

Welk fired Alice Lon, the original Champagne Lady, in 1959--on-air--for crossing her legs on a desk during a number. He accused her of "showing too much knee" and said he didn't tolerate "cheesecake" on his show. A massive fan campaign ensued to bring her back; Welk finally relented, but she said no.

Offsite Link

lawrence welk show cast deaths (31)

The cast of The Lawrence Welk Show - 1951 includes: Myron Floren as himself Alice Lon Lawrence Welk and His Orchestra as Themselves Lawrence Welk as Himself - Host When did Lawrence Welk die? Lawrence Welk died on May 17, 1992 at the age of 89.

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lawrence welk show cast deaths (32)

12-05-2011 · This undated image provided by The Lawrence Welk Show shows Lawrence Welk embracing Norma Zimmer, who was known as "The Champagne Lady," who died May 10, 2011 at her home in Brea, Calif. AP (05-13 ...

12-05-2011

lawrence welk show cast deaths (33)

This undated image provided by The Lawrence Welk Show shows Lawrence Welk embracing Norma Zimmer, who was known as "The Champagne Lady," who died May 10, 2011 at her home in Brea, Calif.

AP

(05-13) 04:00 PDT Los Angeles --

Norma Zimmer, the "Champagne Lady" of TV's "The Lawrence Welk Show" and a studio singer who worked with Frank Sinatra and other pop stars, has died. She was 87.

Ms. Zimmer died Tuesday at her home in Brea (Orange County), Welk's son, Larry, said Wednesday. Larry Welk didn't know the cause of death but said Ms. Zimmer had been living an active life in recent years.

"She was one of the most gracious, likable people that anyone could ever meet. The other people on the show, to this day, just respect and love her," Larry Welk said.

Ms. Zimmer performed on Welk's network and later syndicated show from 1960 to 1982 as the "Champagne Lady," the title Welk traditionally gave to his orchestra's lead female singer. Zimmer sang solos and duets with Jimmy Roberts, and she waltzed with Welk to the strains of his effervescent dance tunes tagged "champagne music."

She appeared on the orchestra's public TV specials that have aired (along with repeats of the series) since 1987. Ms. Zimmer took part in a tribute to Welk and his show held this year at the Paley Center for Media in Beverly Hills.

Welk, who stopped performing in 1989, died in 1992.

Ms. Zimmer, born in July 1923 in Larson, Idaho, grew up in Seattle. The petite blonde sang with the Girlfriends, a quartet that performed with Sinatra, Dean Martin and Bing Crosby, including on Crosby's famed recording of "White Christmas."

Ms. Zimmer made several film and TV appearances, including one with Crosby in the 1950 film "Mr. Music" and in an episode of "I Love Lucy," and was the voice of the White Rose in the 1951 Disney film, "Alice in Wonderland."

Her survivors include her sons, Ron and Mark. Her husband, businessman Randy Zimmer, died in 2008.

lawrence welk show cast deaths (34)

Still others left the show over money disputes with Mr. Welk, who paid the minimum union scale to his cast. "We worked at group scale, which was $110 a week, for 10 years," Kathy Lennon recalled.

SANTA MONICA, CALIF. — Santa Monica, Calif. -- Lawrence Welk, a firm taskmaster and consummate businessman whose champagne music was welcomed into the living rooms of Middle America on Saturday nights for an unprecedented 27 years -- the longest prime-time musical program in television history -- has died, it was reported yesterday.

Bernice McGeehan, a spokeswoman for the Welk organization, said that he was 89 when he died at his Santa Monica home Sunday evening of pneumonia.

"He really died peacefully," with family members at his side, she said.

Mr. Welk was a reluctant farm boy who left his home near Strasburg, N.D., when he turned 21 for a career as an itinerant accordion-player.

Mr. Welk and his bubbling music-makers were a television staple for 36 years, making their debut in an era when Arthur Godfrey, Groucho Marx, George Burns and Gracie Allen, Kukla, Fran and Ollie and Jackie Gleason's Honeymooners were at the top of the Nielsens. And they outlasted them all. As recently as 1988 Welk could be heard cueing his band with his "uh-one and uh-two" signature countdown on weekly rebroadcasts of his television shows on PBS outlets throughout the country. Never an innovator, Mr. Welk's criteria for success was to keep it sweet and simple: play the proven standards the people want to hear, in the simplest of arrangements, and in less than three minutes just in case someone did not like a particular song. It was safe-and-sane TV entertainment, painfully predictable and stable and wholesome.

For that, he went virtually without praise from within the TV industry itself. His reward came from his audiences, those who could not wait for their weekly taste of "uh-one and uh-two" accompanied by a succession of Champagne Ladies, accordionists and talented instrumentalists.

Mr. Welk, his orchestra and performers including Norma Zimmer and the Lennon Sisters played the new Baltimore Civic Center on March 31, 1963. Thousands of fans met him at Friendship Airport, and his performance was a sellout, grossing more than $50,000, which was reported as the largest gross in Mr. Welk's history of one-night stands.

Some performers ultimately grew frustrated by his methods, which included control over music and even costume selection. Many quit.

Alice Lon and the Lennon Sisters were two such cases in point.

Ms. Lon was Mr. Welk's "Champagne Lady," the showcased songstress symbolizing the essence of femininity. But she left the show in 1959, in a lingering feud over wanting more variety on her musical menu and -- more sensationally at the time -- in a dispute over the length of her hemlines, which were rising in concert with Welk's chagrin.

"There was a dress code that everyone had to live up to," said Sam Lutz, Welk's long-time manager . . . and that got to be a problem when he started working with a younger generation of people in the music business."

The singing Lennon Sisters -- Janet, Kathy, Peggy and Dianne -- felt working for Mr. Welk put them in a time warp.

"As we got older -- into our teen-age years and then into our 20s -- we wanted to do more sophisticated, more popular music," said Kathy Lennon, who was 12 when she and her sisters joined the show in 1955. "But Mr. Welk frowned on that. He wanted to give people music he thought they could understand, and he didn't think they could understand Beatles songs or Stevie Wonder songs.

"We'd be skipping around toadstools singing "Here Comes Peter Cottontail" while our friends at school were listening to the Beatles," Ms. Lennon said in a 1988 interview.

The Lennons left Mr. Welk in 1968, to the bandleader's dismay.

"He didn't want to let go of his little girls, but by then we all were married and between us had eight children of our own," Kathy Lennon said.

Still others left the show over money disputes with Mr. Welk, who paid the minimum union scale to his cast. "We worked at group scale, which was $110 a week, for 10 years," Kathy Lennon recalled. "After that he agreed to pay us solo scale, $210 a week. That's what we finished out at. When we told him we'd stay if he'd pay us double scale, he told us, 'No act is worth a penny over scale to me.' "

Mr. Welk did set up a generous profit-sharing plan for his performers while giving them freedom to appear on other television shows and to make outside personal appearances.

Not many, however, found extensive work outside of the Welk show. For one thing, they all had to be at the studio for the Saturday night show -- the biggest night of the week for personal appearances.

Mr. Welk was an unlikely candidate for national fame, but parlayed his German accent, charisma and a keen discernment of Middle America's musical taste into a business empire founded on television, records and music publishing. At first uneasy as a television personality, fearful that his fourth-grade education would betray him, he soon enough became smitten by zTC the love affair he developed with his audiences.

Still, he was ever gracious to his fans and the proud patriarch of his so-called Musical Family of studio musicians, dancers, singers, entertainers and support crew members, serving as a gentle but firm disciplinarian and preacher of conservative values.

Long-time band member Barney Liddell, a Roman Catholic, recalled Mr. Welk's reaction when he divorced his wife and later remarried. Mr. Welk, himself a Catholic, fired Mr. Lidell from the band after he announced his intention to remarry.

"He said I'd be living in sin and that's not right. But then he talked to three guys in the band -- a Jew, a Methodist and a Presbyterian -- and they said, 'Why don't you let him run his life and you just run his trombone.' So he called me back on my wedding day and said I had my job back."

Norma Zimmer, who became his last Champagne Lady in 1960, said that Mr. Welk would seldom lose his temper. "He was always in control. You knew he was upset [only] because he'd just beat his leg with his baton. That was his sign that things weren't right."

The sixth of eight children of German immigrants, Mr. Welk was born in his parents' sod house on the family's homestead in North Dakota. His first musical instrument was a violin he fashioned out of an old box and strands of horsehair when he was 3 years old. He graduated to his father's accordion, and in short order became obsessed with wanting to buy his own.

At age 17, he struck a deal with his father, Ludwig, by agreeing to work on the family farm until he was 21, and turning over all the money he made by performing at weddings and other social functions, playing his own prized $400 accordion.

On his 21st birthday, Mr. Welk left home and spent the next year or so living in motel rooms and in the back of touring cars as he and other itinerant musicians formed pickup groups to play in town squares and social halls.

In 1925, Mr. Welk joined a group called "George T. Kelly's Peerless Entertainers," and was billed as the "World's Greatest Accordionist." Two years later, he formed his own band and began playing on radio station WNAX in Yankton, S.D.

During the 1930s, Mr. Welk's band had grown to 10 pieces and was known for a time as the Hotsy Totsy Boys. They began settling into hotel ballroom work -- first, at the St. Paul Hotel in St. Paul, Minn., and starting on New Year's Eve in 1938, the William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh. It was there, with radio broadcasts of the show, that Mr. Welk's music was described as light, bright and frothy -- like champagne.

Mr. Welk didn't miss a beat, changing the name of his group to, "The Champagne Music of Lawrence Welk." Singer Lois Best became his first Champagne Lady, and the musicians became champagne music-makers.

Mr. Welk's band made its headquarters in Chicago during the 1940s, but continued with road shows that ultimately took him in 1951 to the Aragon Ballroom in Santa Monica.

Los Angeles station KTLA telecast an early performance. "As I recall, the show was nothing really special," Mr. Welk recalled in an autobiography. "We played our usual arrangements for the dancers. I danced with some of the ladies and joked with the guests."

But Mr. Welk received immediate favorable response from the show from viewers. "I had a flash of insight, an absolutely firm feeling that the boys and I had 'come home,' and that television was the thing we had been looking for. I went home and said to Fern [his wife], 'I think we've finally found our place in life.' "

In 1956, ABC-TV broadcast Mr. Welk from coast to coast, and for the ensuing 16 years the Welk show missed only one week -- in the aftermath of the assassination of John F. Kennedy in 1963.

ABC finally dropped the show in 1971, deciding that Mr. Welk's audience was too old to attract commercial sponsors looking for a more youthful and affluent market. His sponsors at the time reflected Mr. Welk's demographics: Geritol and Sominex.

Mr. Welk responded by syndicating his own show, which ultimately was picked up by more than 250 stations around the country -- more, even, than had aired his show on ABC.

The program did not miss a week of air time until weekly production ended in 1982.

Two years of reruns appeared in syndication, through 1984, along with two Christmas specials in 1984 and 1985.

Ultimately it proved to be the show that wouldn't go away; a PBS documentary in March 1987 on Mr. Welk's life -- hosted by Kathy Lennon -- received such viewer response -- and fund-raising pledges -- that two years' of reruns were syndicated and appear now on more than 140 public television stations across the country.

Ms. McGeehan, the Welk spokeswoman, said yesterday that the reruns would continue to run through 1994.

In recent years, Mr. Welk and his wife of 61 years spent their retirement primarily at their "Champagne Towers" in Santa Monica. The couple, however, frequently lived at their second home near Escondido, where he turned another small trailer park into a successful, upscale mobile home park and vacation resort.

Besides his wife and son, he is survived by two daughters, 10 grandchildren and a great-granddaughter.

lawrence welk show cast deaths (35)

19-05-1992 · Lawrence Welk was born on March 11, 1903, in a sod farmhouse in the prairie village of Strasburg, N.D., one of eight children of the former Christine Schwab and Ludwig Welk, immigrants from Alsace ...

19-05-1992

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(Video) The Today Show on the Death of Lawrence Welk, May 1992

Lawrence Welk, the band leader whose folksy charm and bubbly brand of "Champagne music" shaped one of the longest-running shows in television history, died on Sunday evening at his home in Santa Monica, Calif. He was 89 years old.

Mr. Welk had been suffering from pneumonia in recent days, said Bernice McGeehan, a spokeswoman for the Welk Group.

With diligence, drive and a cheery "ah-one an' ah-two," the self-taught maestro became one of a handful of television entertainers who defined the viewing habits of a generation. He rose from an immigrant farm family in a German-speaking hamlet in North Dakota to become one of the nation's favorite showmen.

The buoyant Mr. Welk presided over "The Lawrence Welk Show" on ABC on Saturday evenings from 1955 to 1971, when the show was dropped because sponsors said its audience was too old, too rural and too sedate. Reinventing a Show

Undaunted, Mr. Welk signed up more than 250 independent television stations in the United States and Canada and kept the show on television for 11 more years. Repackaged as "Memories With Lawrence Welk," the show has been appearing on public television on Sunday afternoons since 1987.

Mr. Welk was a strict taskmaster, demanding from his performers hard work, thrift and self-discipline. He kept his musical family -- stalwarts like the Champagne Lady, Norma Zimmer, and the Lennon Sisters -- basically intact, at times even by arbitrating marital disputes. These are some of the professional precepts on which he insisted:

*"You have to play what the people understand."

*"Keep it simple so the audience can feel like they can do it too."

*"Champagne music puts the girl back in the boy's arms -- where she belongs." Behind Bob Hope and Disneyland

Over the decades, Mr. Welk became, after Bob Hope, the second-wealthiest performer in show business, and his band and production company became the second-biggest tourist draw of Los Angeles, right behind Disneyland.

Components of the multi-million-dollar Welk conglomerate include a large music library and ownership of the lucrative royalty rights to 20,000 songs. Among them are the entire body of Jerome Kern's work, which Mr. Welk bought for $3.2 million in 1970. The heart of the real estate empire was the Lawrence Welk Village, a 1,000-acre resort-and-retirement complex at Escondido, Calif., near San Diego.

The Welk dance band offered an easy mix of pop, swing, Dixieland, country, Latin, polkas and inspirational music. Detractors called it tinkly Mickey Mouse music dispensed to geriatric audiences. Fans adored the sentimental show as a constant in a changing world and as a reassuring time capsule of a simpler, happier time.

Appraising the Welk show at Madison Square Garden in 1979, John S. Wilson wrote in The New York Times that the formula combined "the stage shows at the Paramount and the Roxy and vaudeville shows at the Palace" and was a reprise of American popular music at midcentury. Sod to Squeezeburgers

Lawrence Welk was born on March 11, 1903, in a sod farmhouse in the prairie village of Strasburg, N.D., one of eight children of the former Christine Schwab and Ludwig Welk, immigrants from Alsace-Lorraine, a region of France that was once part of Germany. His father was a blacksmith turned farmer. The boy dropped out of the fourth grade to farm full time until he was 21.

At night, his father taught him to play an inexpensive accordion, and from the age of 13 he earned money playing at social gatherings. At 17, he played in local bands and formed a group, the three-piece Biggest Little Band in America, to help inaugurate radio station WNAX in Yankton, S.D.

At 24, he put together a six-piece band called the Hotsy-Totsy Boys. He also bought and operated a series of small businesses, one of which featured an accordion-shaped grill that served a product called squeezeburgers. These projects failed, but his fortunes improved as he led bigger bands in ballrooms and hotels in bigger towns and on radio, mostly in the Midwest.

He then moved to Los Angeles, where his show was first telecast. In 1955, when he was 52, his coast-to-coast television program began its long run.

Still, he never overcame his shyness and used prompters to make even brief announcements. He rejected cigarette and beer advertising, hired no comedians for fear of off-color jokes and deleted suggestive lyrics from the orchestra's material. His honors included playing at the 1957 inaugural ball of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. The Positive Side of Hardship

Mr. Welk credited his success in part to his childhood poverty, observing in 1970 that "there's something you learn by hardship, by a little fear" and "one of the real bad conditions we have today is that we don't allow children to work at an early age." He recounted his life and its lessons in several popular books written with Ms. McGeehan, including "Wunnerful, Wunnerful!" (1971) and "Ah-One, Ah-Two!" (1974).

Mr. Welk's birthplace became the subject of controversy in 1990 when Congress approved a $500,000 grant to build a German-Russian museum at the farm where he was born, with a section devoted to the band leader. The appropriation was criticized as pork barrel spending, and it was later rescinded. Mr. Welk's birthplace was refurbished under private sponsorship.

He is survived by his wife, the former Fern Renner, who was a nurse; a son, Lawrence Jr., known as Larry, a business adviser to his father; two daughters, Shirley Fredricks and Donna Mack; 10 grandchildren, and a great-granddaughter.

lawrence welk show cast deaths (36)

19-05-1992 · Still others left the show over money disputes with Welk, who paid the minimum union scale to his cast. “We worked at group scale, which was $110 a week, for 10 years,” Kathy Lennon recalled.

19-05-1992

Lawrence Welk, a firm taskmaster and consummate businessman whose “champagne music” was welcomed into the living rooms of Middle America on Saturday nights for an unprecedented 27 years--the longest-running prime-time musical program in television history--has died, it was reported Monday.

Bernice McGeehan, a spokeswoman for the Welk organization, said he was 89 when he died at his Santa Monica home Sunday night of pneumonia.

“He really died peacefully,” with family members at his side, she said.

Welk was a reluctant farm boy who left his home near Strasburg, N.D., when he turned 21 for a career as an itinerant accordionist.

Welk, whose bubbling music makers were a television staple for 40 years, made his debut in an era when Arthur Godfrey, Groucho Marx, George Burns and Gracie Allen, Kukla, Fran and Ollie and Jackie Gleason’s “Honeymooners” were at the top of the Nielsen ratings. And he outlasted them all. Welk to this day can be heard cuing his band with his “uh-one and uh-two” signature countdown on weekly rebroadcasts of his television shows on PBS outlets throughout the country. They are reported to be No. 1 in the PBS rankings.

Welk was never an innovator. His criterion for success was to keep it sweet and simple: Play the proven standards the people want to hear, in the simplest of arrangements, and in less than three minutes just in case someone did not like a particular song. It was safe-and-sane TV entertainment, predictable and stable and wholesome.

For that, he went virtually without praise from within the television industry. His reward came from his audiences, who could not wait to hear a succession of “Champagne Ladies,” accordionists and talented instrumentalists often forced to submerge their abilities in the routine Welk arrangements.

Some ultimately grew frustrated by his methods, which included control over music and even costume selection. Many quit.

Alice Lon and the Lennon Sisters were two examples.

Lon was one of the television Champagne Ladies, the showcased singers intended to symbolize the essence of femininity. But she left the show in 1959 after a lingering feud over her desire for more variety on her musical menu and--more sensationally at the time--after a dispute over the length of her hemlines, which were rising, along with Welk’s chagrin.

“There was a dress code that everyone had to live up to,” said Sam Lutz, Welk’s long-time manager, " . . . and that got to be a problem when he started working with a younger generation of people in the music business.”

The singing Lennon Sisters--Janet, Kathy, Peggy and Dianne--said later that they felt working for Welk put them in a time warp.

“As we got older--into our teen-age years and then into our 20s--we wanted to do more sophisticated, more popular music,” said Kathy Lennon, who was 12 when she and her sisters joined the show in 1955. “But Mr. Welk frowned on that. He wanted to give people music he thought they could understand, and he didn’t think they could understand Beatles songs or Stevie Wonder songs.”

The Lennons left Welk in 1968, to the bandleader’s dismay.

As with Lon, costumes also were a point of contention with the Lennons.

Kathy Lennon recalled the time the sisters insisted on wearing bathing suits--albeit modest, one-piece suits--for a pool scene taped at Welk’s resort near Escondido.

“Mr. Welk got more letters than you could believe afterwards from people asking him how he could have allowed our legs to be shown on television,” Lennon said. “He came to us with those letters and said, ‘I told you!’ And he told the wardrobe people never to put us in bathing suits again.” “That’s what kept Lawrence Welk on television for so many years. He listened to his audience,” Lennon said.

Still others left the show over money disputes with Welk, who paid the minimum union scale to his cast. “We worked at group scale, which was $110 a week, for 10 years,” Kathy Lennon recalled. “After that he agreed to pay us solo scale, $210 a week. That’s what we finished out at. When we told him we’d stay if he’d pay us double scale, he told us, ‘No act is worth a penny over scale to me.’ ”

Still, most of the crew hung around. “For one thing, there was no other place where a musician could get such a steady job,” said one cast member.

Welk did set up a generous profit-sharing plan for his performers while giving them freedom to appear on other television shows and to make personal appearances.

Not many, however, found extensive work outside of the Welk show. For one thing, they all had to be at the studio for the Saturday night show--the biggest night of the week for personal appearances.

Welk was an unlikely candidate for national fame, but parlayed the German accent he picked up from his immigrant parents, charisma and a keen discernment of Middle America’s musical taste into a business empire founded on television, records and music publishing. At first uneasy as a television personality, fearful that his fourth-grade education would betray him, he soon enough developed a love affair with his audiences.

He was ever gracious to his fans and was the proud patriarch of his so-called musical family of studio musicians, dancers, singers, entertainers and support crew members, serving as a gentle but firm disciplinarian and preacher of conservative values.

If Welk played to the older generation, he was perhaps most pleased by the reception he received from younger listeners.

Welk recalled in a 1978 interview with The Times how he once was spotted at a coffee shop in Macksville, Kan., and asked to make an unscheduled appearance at the town’s combined elementary and high school.

“That was the biggest applause I ever had,” he said. “I stayed for a half an hour and played the accordion. It was the highlight of my life.”

Still, Welk understood his primary market and played to it like the maestro he was.

In one of his seven books, “You’re Never Too Young,” Welk told of a time he toyed with his tried-and-proven hotel ballroom road show.

“A road-show audience is an instant barometer,” he wrote. “I can tell by the sound and amount of applause--or lack of it--just what it is an audience likes. A quiet audience just kills me.”

The sixth of eight children, Welk was born in a sod house in North Dakota. His first musical instrument was a violin he fashioned from an old box and strands of horsehair when he was 3 years old. He graduated to his father’s accordion, and in short order wanted to buy his own.

At age 17, he struck a deal with his father, Ludwig. He agreed to work on the family farm until he was 21, and turn over all the money he made by performing at social functions, playing his own prized $400 accordion.

On his 21st birthday, Welk left home and spent the next year or so living in motel rooms and in the back of touring cars as he and other itinerant musicians formed pickup groups to play in town squares and social halls.

In 1925, Welk joined a group called George T. Kelly’s Peerless Entertainers and was billed as the “world’s greatest accordionist.” Two years later, he formed his own band and began playing on the radio in Yankton, S.D.

During the 1930s, Welk’s band grew to 10 pieces and was known for a time as the Hotsy Totsy Boys. They began settling into hotel ballroom work. It was in Pittsburgh, where his shows were played on the radio, that Welk’s music was described as light and frothy--like champagne.

Welk did not miss a beat, changing the name of his show to “The Champagne Music of Lawrence Welk.” Singer Lois Best became his first Champagne Lady, and the musicians became champagne music makers.

Lutz, Welk’s manager, recalled that it was not until the mid-1940s that Welk finally began to speak freely to his audiences, a reflection of his insecurity with his accent.

“A manager at one of the theaters in Milwaukee asked Lawrence to do the announcing for the show. Lawrence said, ‘I can’t do it. I don’t speak well.’ The manager said, ‘If you talk, I’ll give you $100 more.’ ‘For $100 more, I’ll talk.’ That’s when Lawrence started getting into it,” Lutz said.

Welk’s band was headquartered in Chicago during the 1940s, but continued with road shows that ultimately took him in 1951 to Santa Monica’s Aragon Ballroom.

TV station KTLA Channel 5 broadcast an early performance. “As I recall, the show was nothing really special,” Welk wrote in his autobiography, “Wunnerful, Wunnerful.” “We played our usual arrangements for the dancers. I danced with some of the ladies and joked with the guests.”

But Welk received an immediate favorable response from viewers. “I had a flash of insight, an absolutely firm feeling that the boys and I had ‘come home,’ and that television was the thing we had been looking for. I went home and said to Fern (his wife), ‘I think we’ve finally found our place in life.’ ”

In 1956, ABC-TV broadcast Welk from coast to coast, and over 16 years the Welk show missed only one week--in the aftermath of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963.

ABC dropped the show in 1971, deciding Welk’s audience was too old to attract sponsors looking for a more youthful and affluent market. His sponsors at the time reflected Welk’s demographics: Geritol and Sominex.

Welk responded by syndicating his show, which ultimately was picked up by more than 250 stations around the country--more than had aired his show on ABC.

The program did not miss a week of air time until weekly production ended in 1982.

Ultimately it proved to be the show that would not go away. A PBS documentary in March, 1987, on Welk’s life--with Kathy Lennon as host--received such good viewer response and fund-raising pledges that two years of reruns were syndicated. They appear now on more than 240 public television stations.

Welk spokeswoman McGeehan said Monday that the reruns will continue at least through 1994.

Welk’s company, Teleklew Inc., deals in music publishing, recordings and real estate, including hundreds of acres of residential investment property north of Escondido, a mobile home park near Palm Springs and an office and apartment complex in Santa Monica. Lawrence Welk Jr., the eldest child, is company president.

In recent years, Welk and his wife of 61 years spent their retirement primarily at their “Champagne Towers” in Santa Monica. The couple, however, frequently lived at their second home in Bonsall near Escondido. It was in Escondido that Welk turned another small trailer park into a successful, upscale mobile home park and vacation resort.

A museum and theater built there in his honor attract busloads of tourists.

In addition to his wife and son, he is survived by two daughters, 10 grandchildren and a great-granddaughter. Funeral services will be private.

(Video) Lawrence Welk Death Notice for PBS by Bob Warren

FAQs

Were there any black people on Lawrence Welk? ›

The Welk show was an all-white folks show until 1964 when African-American tap dancer Arthur Duncan was hired as a weekly regular. He was the first black to appear as a regular performer on a primetime television show. Welk also gave Charley Pride his television breakthrough. Charley made three separate appearances.

Who has died from The Lawrence Welk Show? ›

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Joe Feeney, who crooned “Danny Boy” and other standards for 25 years on “The Lawrence Welk Show,” died on April 16 in Carlsbad, Calif. He was 76 and lived in San Marcos, Calif.

How much did Lawrence Welk pay his band members? ›

Welk, who paid the minimum union scale to his cast. "We worked at group scale, which was $110 a week, for 10 years," Kathy Lennon recalled. "After that he agreed to pay us solo scale, $210 a week.

What did Lawrence Welk always say? ›

There was a catchphrase that Welk was famous for: “Wonderful, wunnerful!”. A wide range of music was played on the show, from polkas ah two, and ah…” The music on the show ranged from polka tunes to novelty songs to big band standards.

Why did Lawrence Welk have an accent? ›

Welk's parents were immigrants from Alsace-Lorraine who spoke only German to the nine children they raised on their farm outside Strasburg, North Dakota. In fact, Lawrence Welk did not learn English until his early 20s, which explains the accent that became his trademark.

Why was Betty White's show canceled? ›

During 1954, NBC repeatedly changed the show's time slot and it was quietly canceled on December 31.

Were there any scandals on The Lawrence Welk Show? ›

The show's titular bandleader and accordionist oversaw the weekly musical offerings with a big smile — but behind the scenes, his show's cast endured scandals ranging from a crazed celebrity stalker to secret gay celebrity sex lives, and even cases of child molestation

Why did Sissy leave The Lawrence Welk Show? ›

King and Welk's relationship began to deteriorate after Welk discovered that King was asking her friends and relatives to write letters praising her performances. A well-known task master, Welk's patience ran dry when he abruptly fired her in 1978 over her tardiness to work.

Did they lip sync on The Lawrence Welk Show? ›

For the entire run, musical numbers were divided fairly evenly between prerecorded lip- and finger-sync performances and those recorded live on film or tape.

What was Lawrence welks net worth? ›

That's the same as around $277 million in today's dollars. Lawrence Welk passed away on May 17, 1992, at the age of 89.
...
Lawrence Welk Net Worth.
Net Worth:$150 Million
Date of Birth:Mar 11, 1903 - May 17, 1992 (89 years old)
Gender:Male
Profession:Musician, Bandleader, Impresario
Nationality:United States of America

Who was the first Champagne Lady on Lawrence Welk Show? ›

Lois Herman, of Mendota Heights, Welk's “Original Champagne Lady” and later the featured singer in a 35-year run at the Prom Ballroom in St. Paul, died Oct. 28 of heart failure. She was 98.

Was Lawrence Welk a good musician? ›

Lawrence Welk was not just a great composer but also a great musician. And loved his accent there. And that the TV series was to showcase that over singers whether guest starring or were LW regulars there. Plus on that over in dancers there.

What language did Lawrence Welk speak? ›

His parents were born in Alsace, now part of France but once part of Germany. In 1892 they came to this country to farm in Strasburg, N.D. In the remote, agricultural community, Mr. Welk spoke as much German as English as a boy, and he dropped out of school in the fourth grade.

Did Lawrence Welk speak German? ›

He lived in a rural German-speaking town and dropped out of school in the fourth grade in order to farm full time. In the New York Times, Welk credited his incredible success in part to his hard youth; he did not speak English until he was 21.

Was Lawrence Welk easy to work for? ›

Mr. Welk was a strict taskmaster, demanding from his performers hard work, thrift and self-discipline. He kept his musical family -- stalwarts like the Champagne Lady, Norma Zimmer, and the Lennon Sisters -- basically intact, at times even by arbitrating marital disputes.

Who was the black tap dancer on The Lawrence Welk Show? ›

Arthur Duncan, tap dancer and singer who gained fame as the first African-American performer on the popular television program, The Lawrence Welk Show, was born in Pasadena, California. He enrolled in Pasadena City College to study pharmacy but left school to pursue a career in show business.

Where was Lawrence Welk filmed? ›

The 1965–66 season was taped at the Hollywood Palace because that was ABC's only West Coast TV studio at the time equipped for live or taped color production; Welk had insisted that the show go color in 1965 because he believed that being broadcast in color was critical to the continued success of his program.

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4. Lawrence Welk PBS Special - "Milestones and Memories (A Musical Family Reunion)" - 2001
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