lawrence welk show tv (2022)

lawrence welk show tv (1)

The Lawrence Welk Show: With Lawrence Welk, Myron Floren, Dick Dale, Jimmy Roberts. One of the most successful and fondly-remembered shows in TV history, "The Lawrence Welk Show" featured musical numbers and skits, with host Welk leading the band.

Renowned bandleader Lawrence Welk began his own variety series in 1955... and it has never stopped running. Each program was straightforward musical numbers from Welk's band (many of which had featured solos at one point or another), as well as vocal selections and dance numbers from the show's cast. Most of the introductions to the performances, read stiffy by Welk, were kept short. Many of the shows revolved around a certain theme (e.g., "The Music Man" or the Fourth of July), with appropriate songs and dance numbers. The most famous of the featured singers were the Lennon Sisters (Dianne, Janet, Kathy and Peggy), who were featured most every week for 13 years. At the end of each show, Welk would invite women from the audience on stage to dance with him as the theme, "Bubbles in the Wine" (and later, "Champagne Fanfare") played. The show enjoyed a 16-year network run on ABC, and later a succesful 11-year syndicated run. Just months after the original series ended, older shows (from c. 1965-1982) were repackaged with new footage and entered a long run in both syndication and on PBS. —Brian Rathjen

variety show1980s1970s1960s1950s2 more

lawrence welk show tv (2)

By what name was The Dodge Dancing Party (1955) officially released in India in English?

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The Lawrence Welk Show airs each week on 279 public television stations nationally, is seen by more than three million people each week and has more viewers than BET, MTV and VH-1 combined on Saturday nights. According to Nielsen Ratings, The Lawrence Welk Show is the highest-rated syndicated series airing on public television.

Did you know The Lawrence Welk Show is celebrating over 50 years on national television? No other prime-time show can claim that distinction, and it's still in production!

The Lawrence Welk Show airs each week on 279 public television stations nationally, is seen by more than three million people each week and has more viewers than BET, MTV and VH-1 combined on Saturday nights. According to Nielsen Ratings, The Lawrence Welk Show is the highest-rated syndicated series airing on public television.

Lawrence Welk: Television’s Music Man was the first special produced for public television (1987) and it kicked-off the craze for Welk on public television. Due to its success, Bob Allen brought it to public television nationally on a weekly basis through OETA.

OETA went on to produce 12 Welk specials, including "A Champagne Toast to the Big Bands" (1991), "The Lennon Sisters: Easy to Remember" (1992), "From the Heart: A Tribute to Lawrence Welk and the American Dream" (1993), "The Lawrence Welk Holiday Special: Great Moments & Memories" (1994), "Lawrence Welk: Then & Now" (1995), "A Lawrence Welk Family Christmas" (1995), "From Lawrence Welk: To America with Love" (1997), "Lawrence Welk's Favorite Holidays" (1998), "Lawrence Welk's Songs of Faith" (1999), "Lawrence Welk Milestone & Memories" (2000), "Lawrence Welk: God Bless America" (2003) and "Lawrence Welk Precious Memories" (2005).

OETA produces the show for national distribution. The wraparounds (host segments featuring the Welk stars) are taped every other year and feature original members from The Lawrence Welk Show introducing that week’s featured show. The stars bring the viewer up-to-date on their lives, their careers, etc. during these wraparounds.

Lawrence Welk died May 17, 1992, but his legacy continues throughout the country.

View the full schedule with detailed episode descriptions and original air dates here.

lawrence welk show tv (4)

The Lawrence Welk Show cast list, including photos of the actors when available. This list includes all of the The Lawrence Welk Show main actors and actresses, so if they are an integral part of the show you'll find them below.You can various bits of trivia about these The Lawrence Welk Show stars, such as where the actor was born and what their year of birth is.

  • lawrence welk show tv (5)1

    Aladdin was an actor and a musician. ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (6)2

    Alice Lon Wyche (November 23, 1926 – April 24, 1981), known as Alice Lon, was an American singer and dancer on The Lawrence Welk Show during its early years on network television. ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (7)3

    Arthur Duncan (born September 25, 1933) is an American tap dancer, known for his stint as a performer on The Lawrence Welk Show from 1964 to 1982, which made him the first African-American regular on ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (8)4

    Ava Marlene Barber (born June 28, 1954) is an American country music singer and performer. She is best remembered for her performances on The Lawrence Welk Show throughout much of the 1970s and early ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (9)5

    Barbara Boylan (born (1942-08-12) August 12, 1942 in Long Beach, California) is an American dancer and former television personality who was featured on The Lawrence Welk Show from 1961 to 1967, and ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (10)6

    The Mickey Mouse Club, The Lawrence Welk Show

    Robert Wilkie "Bobby" Burgess (born May 19, 1941, Long Beach, California) is an American dancer and singer. He was one of the original Mouseketeers. Later, he was a regular on The Lawrence Welk Show. ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (11)7

    Robert Havens (born May 3, 1930) is an American big band and jazz musician who appeared on The Lawrence Welk Show from 1960 to 1982. His instrument is the trombone.Born to a musical family in Quincy, ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (12)8

    Robert Lido (September 21, 1914 – August 9, 2000) was an American musician and singer who was a regular member of television's The Lawrence Welk Show. His instrument was the violin. Born in Jersey ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (13)9

    Robert Howard Ralston (born July 2, 1938, in Upland, California) is an American pianist and organist who performed on television's The Lawrence Welk Show from 1963 until 1982, when the series ended. ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (14)10

    Charlotte Harris is an American musician. ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (15)11

    Claire Yvonne King (born January 3, 1946) professionally Cissy King, is an American-born singer and dancer best known as a featured performer on The Lawrence Welk Show television program.King was ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (16)12

    Clay Hart (born July 1, 1942) is an American country music singer and guitarist who was a member of The Lawrence Welk Show television program from 1969 to 1975. ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (17)13

    Richard L. Dale (September 14, 1926 – December 26, 2014) was an American singer and musician, best known as a featured singer and saxophone player on the television variety show The Lawrence Welk ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (18)14
  • lawrence welk show tv (19)15

    Gail Farrell (born October 6, 1947) is an American singer and songwriter, best known for her work on the variety program The Lawrence Welk Show. ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (20)16

    The Lawrence Welk Show, Showcase '68

    Guy Lee Hovis, Jr. (born September 24, 1941), is an American singer, who, along with his former wife, Ralna English, a native of West Texas, was one of the featured acts of the ABC and syndicated ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (21)17

    Henry Falcon Cuesta, Sr. (December 23, 1931 – December 17, 2003), was an American woodwind musician who was a cast member of The Lawrence Welk Show. His primary instrument was the clarinet, but he ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (22)18

    Prince Planet, The Lawrence Welk Show

    Jerry Burke (July 26, 1911 – February 13, 1965) was a musician who played the organ and piano for the Lawrence Welk orchestra from 1934 to 1965. ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (23)19

    Jimmy Roberts (April 6, 1923 – February 6, 1999) was an American tenor singer. He was a featured performer on the TV variety program The Lawrence Welk Show during its entire broadcast run from 1955 ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (24)20

    Joe Feeney (August 15, 1931 – April 16, 2008) was an American tenor singer who was a member of The Lawrence Welk Show television program. ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (25)21

    Johnathan Zell (born November 24, 1947) is an American musician, best known as a trumpeter from The Lawrence Welk Show, a musical, variety-show television series. ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (26)22

    Jo Ann Castle (born September 3, 1939) is an American honky-tonk pianist, best remembered for appearing on The Lawrence Welk Show. She adopted her stage name from the name of an accordion ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (27)23

    Kathie Sullivan (born May 31, 1953) is an American-born singer who appeared on television's The Lawrence Welk Show from 1976 to 1982. ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (28)24

    The Lawrence Welk Show, The Delo And Daly Show

    Kenneth Edward Delo (December 8, 1938 – February 8, 2016) was an American singer best known as a member of television's The Lawrence Welk Show.Born and reared in River Rouge, Michigan, Delo started ...more

  • lawrence welk show tv (29)25

    Lawrence "Bullfrog" Hooper (July 22, 1917 in Independence, Missouri – June 10, 1983 in Los Angeles, California) was an American musician and vocalist. He was best known to television audiences as ...more

More FAQs for lawrence welk show tv

  • What channel is Lawrence Welk on Tonight?

    The Lawrence Welk Show is an American televised musical variety show hosted by big band leader Lawrence Welk.The series aired locally in Los Angeles for four years, from 1951 to 1955, then nationally for another 16 years on ABC from 1955 to 1971, followed by 11 years in first-run syndication from 1971 to 1982. Repeat episodes are broadcast in the United States by Public Broadcasting Service ...

    Did you know The Lawrence Welk Show is celebrating over 50 years on national television? No other prime-time show can claim that distinction, and it's still in production!

    The Lawrence Welk Show airs each week on 279 public television stations nationally, is seen by more than three million people each week and has more viewers than BET, MTV and VH-1 combined on Saturday nights. According to Nielsen Ratings, The Lawrence Welk Show is the highest-rated syndicated series airing on public television.

    Lawrence Welk: Television’s Music Man was the first special produced for public television (1987) and it kicked-off the craze for Welk on public television. Due to its success, Bob Allen brought it to public television nationally on a weekly basis through OETA.

    OETA went on to produce 12 Welk specials, including "A Champagne Toast to the Big Bands" (1991), "The Lennon Sisters: Easy to Remember" (1992), "From the Heart: A Tribute to Lawrence Welk and the American Dream" (1993), "The Lawrence Welk Holiday Special: Great Moments & Memories" (1994), "Lawrence Welk: Then & Now" (1995), "A Lawrence Welk Family Christmas" (1995), "From Lawrence Welk: To America with Love" (1997), "Lawrence Welk's Favorite Holidays" (1998), "Lawrence Welk's Songs of Faith" (1999), "Lawrence Welk Milestone & Memories" (2000), "Lawrence Welk: God Bless America" (2003) and "Lawrence Welk Precious Memories" (2005).

    OETA produces the show for national distribution. The wraparounds (host segments featuring the Welk stars) are taped every other year and feature original members from The Lawrence Welk Show introducing that week’s featured show. The stars bring the viewer up-to-date on their lives, their careers, etc. during these wraparounds.

    Lawrence Welk died May 17, 1992, but his legacy continues throughout the country.

    View the full schedule with detailed episode descriptions and original air dates here.

    (Video) Lawrence Welk Show - "Those were the days" - 1975 - Complete HD

    The Lawrence Welk Show

  • Where to watch Lawrence Welk?

    Lawrence Welk was always on tv in on Saturday nights. I got such joy today hearing my Mom singing along with the songs and laughing. We watch PBS every Saturday evening to see this show. I am not sure any generation is as loyal to anyone as these folks are to Lawrence Welk.

    Watch 3 Classic Episodes of the Lawrence Welk Show

  • When is Lawrence Welk on PBS?

    Watch The Lawrence Welk Show Saturdays at 6:00. Tune in to watch wonderful skits and musical numbers from times gone by! Problems Playing Video? Before you submit an error, please consult our Troubleshooting Guide (opens in new window). Your report has been successfully submitted. Thank you for helping us improve PBS Video.

    Membership Drive | The Lawrence Welk Show | Season 2020

  • Where there any Gay Lawrence Welk cast members?

    LAWRENCE WELK AND THE CHAMPAGNE MUSIC MAKERSORIE AMADEOGEORGE AUBRYBILL PAGEJACK MARTINRUSS KLEINJACK DUMONTDON BONNEEBOB DAVISDAVE EDWARDSJOEY SCHMIDTMore items...

    I heard a rumor once about Arthur Duncan.

    Just not Myron Floren, please.

    Bobby of Bobby and Sissy? Sissy.

    Tom Netherton. Bobby is straight but bubbly. Jo Ann Castle, a real horn dog!

    Bobby married and had children and they are still together. He does not identify as gay.

    Offsite Link

    Myron is straight and a real skirt chaser...into chicken

    I think Tom Netherton is straight. He tried to pick me up years ago at Harrah's Lake Tahoe.

    Tom Netherton was (is?) So Very Gay that Lawrence Welk himself could not refrain from making a bitchy observation that Tom was "a big hit, and NOT JUST WIT' THE LADIES." I actually saw this on PBS and the BF and I laughed our asses off. What an evil old cunt Welk was.

    Tank you, tank you. Now the lovely Bobby and Cissy. To av-Oyd any Con-fus-ion, Cissy is the one wearin' the dress.

    I've heard that Lawrence played out his "master-servant" fantasy by fucking Arthur Duncan after every show.

    Who is Lawrence Welk? Was this some 80's show that most of us were to young to remember?

    [quote]Was this some 80's show that most of us were to young to remember?

    Oh, dear.

    Was Tom the bleached blond guy? If so, he's the guy who had the affair with Kathie Lee's first husband (the christian record producer).

    I used to see Norma Zimmer at Crazy Nanny's.

    Norma Zimmer loved the man-sex. She used to visit gay baths in NYC and cheer on the men, especially those who were engaged in group sex. Actually, she was the only woman who I ever saw at the baths.

    If we asked, she would always sing. She always said that she thought Bette Midler was a vulgar slut who only would do anything for money. Norma, unlike Bette, was a true friend of the gays.

    Believe me, I often heard Norma crooning as I was being penetrated, even double-penetrated, by many hot guys.

    Birmingham was a city so starved for Culture in the '80s that there was great hubbub and gossip when Norma broke a bone after being thrown from a horse on the ranch of some rich friends of hers south of town.

    Tom Netherton was very handsome in a wholesome kind of way, but his singing defined bland.

    I have a copy of his autobiography which I think was written about 30 years ago, and he says that he loves women but that he hadn't found the right girl yet.

    I guess we can all do the math.

    I knew as a kid that Tom Netherton was a big old 'mo. That perfect laquered hair. The way he moved his mouth when he sang those cheesy songs. He was a total cheeseball PARODY of himself and the clown didn't even know it. He was an SNL skit character. He was just SO in love with the sound of his own treacly voice. He was a sitcom character. Handsome, yes. But THE ultimate example of a cheesy 70's/80's closet case. I have met a hundred of them throughout my life, usually doing musical theatre.

    Tom has accepted Christ, so he can't possibly be gay.

    Check this out at your peril.

    Offsite Link

    And what would have happened to that sissy Bobby if he had come out of the closet? Would he still have been on the show? Methinks not. Get him married to cover up.

    Tom putting the nethie into Netherton.

    Offsite Link

    They experimented with hip in the late 60's.

    Offsite Link

    (Video) Lawrence Welk's TV Treasures (PBS Special 2007) - Complete HD

    Experimented, yes; succeeded ... well ...

    Offsite Link

    Wowza, that's some website R20! So Tom Netherton lives near me in VA now? I feel like a DL road-trip might be in order. He doesn't have anything on his upcoming calendar, but we can hope.

    Tom couldn't hide it but on the other hand, maybe no one told him? I know he belonged to some religious cult when he was young so I think he believed being gay was a sin.

    As I said, he belonged to a religious cult. They all lived together like a family and they farmed and did whatever other shit they could do to make a living. Anyway...wish someone had told the guy he was gay. I hope that he has given into his urges and had a few boyfriend ot two.

    R13

    WTH? Kathie Lee's first hubby had a fling with a man ??

    I must have been living under a rock to have missed this.

    Tell me more.

    Myron's been playing the Accordion in the Sky since 2005 where he joined their band at 85.

    I always wondered what Norma Zimmer had to do in order to hold the title of Champagne Lady.

    Tom Netherton used to sweat so much on the show that I'm surprised he didn't get electrocuted by the microphone. He was also the only performer on the show that I ever saw go up on his lyrics (ironically, it was "Young at Heart" which begins, "Fairy tales can come true..." and then he froze and went, "buh-buh-buh-buh." He forgot more lyrics later in the song. Kathie Lee outed him in her autobiography when she wrote about her first husband, who was gay and "lived with a gay performer on the Lawrence Welk Show."

    I don't know if there were any other gays on the show, but piano player Bob Ralston was married to the harshest looking Dutch lady you ever saw. He later went to prison for molesting one of his young male piano students, but he's out of prison now and apparently nobody on the show holds it against him, as he frequently appears on Welk reunion specials.

    If you watch the PBS rebroadcasts and reunion shows, it's a little sad to see these performers today. They were famous for the brief time they appeared on the show and now have to base their entire careers on their status as a "former Welk star" as they appear on cruise ships, small nightclubs, etc. And they are all trying to find ways to make more money. Ken Delo sells hypnosis tapes and a self-published novel; the Lennons sell dolls; Ava Barber opened a sandwich shop, etc., etc.

    More of Tom and a few others.

    Offsite Link

    OMG, that link. I am crying with laughter as I type! Tom Netherton is gayer than a tree full of parrots on Liberace's lanai.

    And I am going to adopt the name "Inese's mother, Tusnelda" as my DL monicker from now on. With names like that, those two just HAVE to be Mormons from Utah.

    R31, that's some good dirt on Bob Ralston—[italic]ewww[/italic]!

    Boy, Tusnelda's got it bad!

    Joe Feeney. But I can't talk about it.

    Guy of Guy and Ralna got remarried—that sinner! Believe it or not, I think he and Ralna still perform together on occasion. Their divorce was something of a scandal, as they were Sonny and Cher for squares.

    Offsite Link

    I just discovered Ken Delo and had a little crush on him until I went to his website and saw him now. Father Time is a bastard.

    Natalie Nevins did have a strange, piggy-looking nose. Didn't she have some kind of breakdown that forced her to quit the show?

    Charlotte could really wrap her legs around that cello.

    Welk fired Alice Lon, the original Champagne Lady, in 1959--on-air--for crossing her legs on a desk during a number. He accused her of "showing too much knee" and said he didn't tolerate "cheesecake" on his show. A massive fan campaign ensued to bring her back; Welk finally relented, but she said no.

    Offsite Link

    Where there any gay Lawrence Welk cast members?

lawrence welk show tv (30)

06-08-2021 · 'Lawrence Welk Show' to (at long last) take final bow on South Dakota Public Broadcasting The syndicated TV program (all reruns) will still be carried in …

06-08-2021

VERMILLION, S.D. — Ah one, and ah two, no more.

Bandleader Lawrence Welk, the North Dakotan with the accordionists and baton and hour-long television special, may finally be signing off after nearly a century on South Dakota's radio and television waves.

That's because South Dakota Public Broadcasting, which has carried reruns of "The Lawrence Welk Show" since 1986, has opted not to renew another two-year run of the program, citing declining viewership.

"It was not an easy decision to make," said Fritz Miller, SDPB's director of marketing, who told Forum News Service about the decision last month, noting the show's renewal has biennially set off a hemming-and-hawing session among staff. "Aug. 7 is the last one."

Meaning Welk, whose sweet and easy (and sometimes polka-laden) big band music has been on almost continuously in one form or another since before the Dust Bowl, has left the building.

And that's left some folks scratching their heads.

"I wonder why they're not going to renew the contract here in South Dakota?" asked Clarence Shoemaker, 82, of Gregory, South Dakota, when told the news earlier this week. "I know some people, especially over in Yankton, still tune in."

Other public TV stations in neighboring states still carry the show, such as Nebraska and North Dakota.

"Iowa PBS continues to air 'The Lawrence Welk Show' each Saturday evening, as it has since September of 1987," said Susan Ramsey, spokeswoman for Iowa PBS.

And a Welk-related publicist with the Oklahoma Educational Television Authority, who has produced the show since the 1980s, doesn't buy the ratings decline, either.

"Oh I don't believe that," Susie Dowdy scoffed, on a phone call last week. "We're on all over the country."

Still, there's also a sense in South Dakota that, for whatever reason, the viewers — always at the top end of the plus-65 demographic — just aren't there anymore.

Just a few years ago Welk drew big audiences for the public station unaccustomed to blockbuster viewership, says Miller. But station officials say that number has dropped off over the last five years, especially over the last year as the pandemic has sent more viewers to digital spaces.

"What we've seen in the ratings has been a trendline downward," Miller acknowledged.

While Welk was a North Dakota native (born in Strasburg), the celebrated "champagne music" maker cut his chops one state to the south, according to his 1971 memoir. In the 1920s, the ambitious, clear-eyed son of German immigrants drove down from Bismarck on a frigid night looking for New Orleans, but pulled off with his freezing band at a hotel in Yankton, South Dakota.

That next morning he first broadcast over the airwaves of WNAX, a massive radio station stretching the eastern width of the state.

Since then, for nearly a century, Welk has been broadcast in one form or another — on a national radio show out of Pittsburgh and Chicago, then, beginning in 1955, on ABC out of Los Angeles. Since 1986, Welk's variety show, featuring the Lennon Sisters, the Irish tenor Joe Feeney and accordionist Myron Floren, have played on South Dakota Public Broadcasting via syndication.

In the meantime, Welk — who died in 1992 at age 89 — made pit stops at the (World's Only) Corn Palace in Mitchell and to visit his favorite pen pal, Edna Stoner, in Beresford, South Dakota.

And his legacy still sings in the Rushmore State.

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While Welk was an inaugural recipient (along with actress Dorothy Stickney) of the Theodore Roosevelt Rough Rider Award, the Strasburg Svengali counted pivotal moments one Dakota to the south, including his first show away from home (Ipswich), his many years in Yankton, and that time his band walked out on him (in Dallas, South Dakota).

The Dacotah Prairie Museum in Aberdeen can point to an accordion owned by Welk's third cousin on display and tell you about Welk's residence in the area.

Of course, Welk always encouraged viewers to "keep a song in your heart," so it's not like he'll be going anywhere, at least for the true believers.

He will live on in memories.

"When Lawrence Welk was on TV, you know," said Shoemaker, who pens a column for the Gregory Times Advocate, "that was a program that you had everything organized so there were not going to be interruptions during that hour he was on."

Or — given a broad cable package — he may still live on in your TV.

Earlier this summer, a North Dakota TV station honored him on the 70th anniversary of his television debut in 1951. And across the border in Minnesota, they just renewed the program, too.

"We've been airing 'The Lawrence Welk Show' on tptLife since September '94," wrote Sherry Meek, Director of Programming for Twin Cities PBS, in an email. "We know it has a dedicated and passionate audience who look forward to it on tptLife."

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(Video) The Lawrence Welk Show - TV Treasures - 03-17-2007
lawrence welk show tv (33)

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19-24. 3-S-24. 2 Mar 74. We Believe in Music. 941. 19-25. 3-S-25. 9 Mar 74. Lawrence Welk's Golden Anniversary in Show Business.

(a Titles & Air Dates Guide)


Last updated:

Episode list & details from: TVmazeTV.com

Episode # Prod Code Original
Air Date
Titles
Season 1 ABC
1.1- 12 Jul 55First Network Show
2.1- 29 Jul 55July 9, 1955
6.1- 66 Aug 55August 6, 1955
7.1- 713 Aug 55August 13, 1955
12.1-1217 Sep 55September 17, 1955
18.1-1829 Oct 55October 29, 1955
19.1-195 Nov 55November 5, 1955
20.1-2012 Nov 55November 12, 1955
21.1-2119 Nov 55November 19, 1955
22.1-2226 Nov 55November 26, 1955
25.1-2517 Dec 55December 17, 1955
26.1-2624 Dec 55Christmas Show 1955
28.1-287 Jan 56January 7, 1956
29.1-2914 Jan 56January 14, 1956
30.1-3021 Jan 56January 21, 1956
31.1-3128 Jan 56January 28, 1956
35.1-3525 Feb 56February 25, 1956
36.1-363 Mar 56March 3, 1956
37.1-3710 Mar 56March 10, 1956
38.1-3817 Mar 56March 17, 1956
39.1-3924 Mar 56March 24, 1956
41.1-417 Apr 56April 7, 1956
46.1-4612 May 56May 12, 1956
51.1-5116 Jun 56June 16, 1956
53.1-5330 Jun 56June 30, 1956
55.1-5514 Jul 56July 14, 1956
57.1-5728 Jul 56July 28, 1956
58.1-584 Aug 56August 4, 1956
Season 2
79.2- 66 Oct 56October 6, 1956
81.2- 820 Oct 56October 20, 1956
82.2- 927 Oct 56October 27, 1956
84.2-1110 Nov 56November 10, 1956
85.2-1217 Nov 56November 17, 1956
86.2-1324 Nov 56November 24, 1956
88.2-158 Dec 56December 8, 1956
91.2-1829 Dec 56December 29, 1956
99.2-3123 Feb 57Salute to the Heart Fund
100.2-322 Mar 57March 2, 1957
101.2-339 Mar 57March 9, 1957
104.2-3630 Mar 57March 30, 1957
107.2-3920 Apr 57Easter Show
109.2-414 May 57May 4, 1957
115.2-4714 Jun 57June 14, 1957
116.2-4821 Jun 57June 21, 1957
120.2-5220 Jul 57July 20, 1957
126.2-5831 Aug 57August 31, 1957
Season 3
127.3- 17 Sep 57September 7, 1957
137.3-1116 Nov 57November 16, 1957
141.3-1514 Dec 57December 14, 1957
144.3-184 Jan 58January 4, 1958
145.3-1911 Jan 58January 11, 1958
147.3-2125 Jan 58January 25, 1958
148.3-221 Feb 58February 1, 1958
149.3-238 Feb 58February 8, 1958
150.3-2415 Feb 58February 15, 1958
151.3-2522 Feb 58February 22, 1958
153.3-278 Mar 58March 8, 1958
155.3-2922 Mar 58March 22, 1958
156.3-3029 Mar 58March 29, 1958
159.3-3319 Apr 58April 19, 1958
163.3-3717 May 58A Salute to Norway
165.3-3931 May 58May 31, 1958
166.3-407 Jun 58June 7, 1958
167.3-4114 Jun 58June 14, 1958
168.3-4221 Jun 58June 21, 1958
172.3-482 Aug 58August 2, 1958
173.3-499 Aug 58August 9, 1958
175.3-5123 Aug 58August 23, 1958
176.3-5230 Aug 58August 30, 1958
Season 4
183.4- 722 Oct 58October 22, 1958
187.4-1119 Nov 58November 19, 1958
205.4-2925 Mar 59March 25, 1959
207.4-318 Apr 59April 8, 1959
208.4-3215 Apr 59April 15, 1959
Season 5
223.5- 15 Sep 59September 5, 1959
224.5- 212 Sep 59September 12, 1959
228.5- 610 Oct 59October 10, 1959 from Hawaii
231.5- 931 Oct 59October 31, 1959
237.5-1512 Dec 59December 12, 1959
238.5-1619 Dec 59Christmas Show (1959)
239.5-1726 Dec 59December 26, 1959
246.5-2413 Feb 60February 13, 1960
247.5-2520 Feb 60February 20, 1960
259.5-3714 May 60May 14, 1960
262.5-404 Jun 60June 4, 1960
264.5-4218 Jun 60Father's Day
272.5-5027 Aug 60August 27, 1960
Season 6
287.6-1517 Dec 60December 17, 1960
288.6-1624 Dec 60December 24, 1960
291.6-1914 Jan 61January 14, 1961
292.6-2021 Jan 61January 21, 1961
298.6-244 Mar 61March 4, 1961
303.6-318 Apr 61April 8, 1961
304.6-3215 Apr 61April 15, 1961
305.6-3322 Apr 61April 22, 1961
307.6-356 May 61May 6, 1961
310.6-3827 May 61May 27, 1961
311.6-393 Jun 61June 3, 1961
312.6-4010 Jun 61June 10, 1961 from New York
313.6-4117 Jun 61June 17, 1961
314.6-4224 Jun 61June 24, 1961
318.6-4622 Jul 61July 22, 1961
319.6-4729 Jul 61July 29, 1961
321.6-4912 Aug 61August 12, 1961
Season 7
324.7- 12 Sep 61September 2, 1961
325.7- 29 Sep 61September 9, 1961
327.7- 423 Sep 61September 23, 1961
330.7- 714 Oct 61October 14, 1961
331.7- 821 Oct 61October 21, 1961
332.7- 928 Oct 61October 28, 1961
335.7-1218 Nov 61November 18, 1961
336.7-1325 Nov 61November 25, 1961
340.7-1723 Dec 61Christmas Show (1961)
362.7-3926 May 62May 26, 1962
Season 8
380.8- 56 Oct 62October 6, 1962
396.8-2126 Jan 63January 26, 1963
397.8-222 Feb 63February 2, 1963
398.8-239 Feb 63February 9, 1963
399.8-2416 Feb 63February 16, 1963
400.8-2523 Feb 63400th Television Show
412.8-3718 May 63May 18, 1963
421.8-4620 Jul 63July 20, 1963
Season 9
429.9- 114 Sep 63September 14, 1963
430.9- 221 Sep 63September 21, 1963
431.9- 328 Sep 63September 28, 1963
432.9- 45 Oct 63October 5, 1963
433.9- 512 Oct 63October 12, 1963
434.9- 619 Oct 63October 19, 1953
435.9- 726 Oct 63October 26, 1963
436.9- 82 Nov 63November 2, 1963
437.9- 99 Nov 63November 9, 1963
438.9-1016 Nov 63November 16, 1963
439.9-1123 Nov 63November 23, 1963 Thanksgiving Show
451.9-2315 Feb 64February 15, 1964
452.9-2422 Feb 64February 22, 1964 - Southtown USA
453.9-2529 Feb 64February 29, 1964
459.9-3111 Apr 64April 11, 1964
460.9-3218 Apr 64April 18, 1964
462.9-342 May 64May 2, 1964
Season 10
480.10- 15 Sep 64September 5, 1964
484.10- 53 Oct 64October 3, 1964
486.10- 717 Oct 64October 17, 1964
491.10-1221 Nov 64Thanksgiving (1964)
493.10-144935 Dec 64December 5, 1964
495.10-1649519 Dec 64Christmas Show (1964)
496.10-1749626 Dec 64New Year's Eve Show (1964)
498.10-199 Jan 65January 9, 1965
499.10-2016 Jan 65January 16, 1965
500.10-2150023 Jan 65January 23, 1965 - 500th Show
502.10-235026 Feb 65Country & Western Show (1965)
503.10-2450313 Feb 65February 13, 1965
514.10-351 May 65May 1, 1965
524.10-4510 Jul 65July 10, 1965
Season 11
534.11- 318 Sep 65September 18, 1965
539.11- 823 Oct 65October 23, 1965
540.11- 930 Oct 65October 30, 1965
541.11-106 Nov 65November 6, 1965
542.11-1113 Nov 65November 13, 1965
544.11-1327 Nov 65November 27, 1965
545.11-144 Dec 65December 4, 1965
547.11-1618 Dec 65December 18, 1965
548.11-171 Jan 66January 1, 1966
554.11-2312 Feb 66February 12, 1966
555.11-2419 Feb 66February 19, 1966
556.11-2526 Feb 66February 26, 1966
557.11-265 Mar 66March 5, 1966
559.11-2819 Mar 66March 19, 1966
562.11-319 Apr 66April 9, 1966
563.11-3216 Apr 66April 16, 1966
564.11-3323 Apr 66April 23, 1966
569.11-3828 May 66May 28, 1966
570.11-3911 Jun 66June 11, 1966
572.11-4125 Jun 66June 25, 1966
574.11-439 Jul 66July 9, 1966
575.11-4423 Jul 66July 23, 1966
576.11-456 Aug 66August 6, 1966
Season 12
582.12- 117 Sep 66September 17, 1966 - 12th Season Premiere
585.12- 48 Oct 66October 8, 1966
586.12- 515 Oct 66October 15, 1966
588.12- 729 Oct 66October 29, 1966
590.12- 912 Nov 66November 12, 1966
591.12-1019 Nov 66November 19, 1966
592.12-1126 Nov 66Salute to Vaudeville
595.12-1417 Dec 66December 17, 1966
596.12-1524 Dec 66Christmas Time
597.12-1631 Dec 66New Year's Eve Show
598.12-177 Jan 67My North Dakota Days
600.12-1921 Jan 67Music! Music! Music!
601.12-2028 Jan 67A Salute to Walt Disney
602.12-214 Feb 67Songs of the South
604.12-2318 Feb 67A Salute to the Big Band Era
605.12-2425 Feb 67Country & Western Show
607.12-2611 Mar 67The Music Makers Salute St. Patricks Day
608.12-2718 Mar 67March 18, 1967
609.12-2825 Mar 67March 25, 1967
610.12-291 Apr 67Salute to Spring
613.12-3222 Apr 67April 22, 1967
614.12-3329 Apr 67April 29, 1967
615.12-346 May 67May 6, 1967
616.12-3513 May 67May 13, 1967
617.12-3620 May 67May 20, 1967
618.12-3727 May 67May 27, 1967
619.12-383 Jun 67June 3, 1967
621.12-4024 Jun 67June 24, 1967
623.12-4222 Jul 67July 22, 1967
624.12-435 Aug 67August 5, 1967
626.12-452 Sep 67September 2, 1967
Season 13
627.13- 116 Sep 67September 16, 1967
629.13- 330 Sep 67September 30, 1967
633.13- 728 Oct 67October 28, 1967
636.13-1018 Nov 67November 18, 1967
637.13-1125 Nov 67November 25, 1967
638.13-122 Dec 67December 2, 1967
639.13-139 Dec 67December 9, 1967
641.13-1523 Dec 67December 23, 1967
642.13-1630 Dec 67December 30, 1967
643.13-176 Jan 68January 6, 1968
644.13-1813 Jan 68January 13, 1968
645.13-1920 Jan 68January 20, 1968
646.13-2027 Jan 68January 27, 1968
647.13-213 Feb 68February 3, 1968
648.13-2210 Feb 68February 10, 1968
649.13-2317 Feb 68February 17, 1968
651.13-252 Mar 68March 2, 1968
652.13-269 Mar 68March 9, 1968
657.13-3113 Apr 68April 13, 1968
661.13-3511 May 68May 11, 1968
662.13-3618 May 68May 18, 1968
663.13-3725 May 68May 25, 1968
664.13-381 Jun 68June 1, 1968
666.13-4015 Jun 68June 15, 1968
667.13-4122 Jun 68June 22, 1968
673.13-473 Aug 68August 3, 1968
674.13-4917 Aug 68August 17, 1968
676.13-5131 Aug 68August 31, 1968
Season 14
679.14- 221 Sep 68September 21, 1968
687.14-1016 Nov 68November 16, 1968
688.14-1123 Nov 68Thanksgiving Show
689.14-127 Dec 68Railroads Show
690.14-1314 Dec 68December 14, 1968
691.14-1421 Dec 68Christmas Show
692.14-1528 Dec 68New Year's Eve Show
696.14-1925 Jan 69Music Memories
697.14-201 Feb 69Small Towns of America
702.14-258 Mar 69Working Songs
706.14-295 Apr 69Easter Show
708.14-3119 Apr 69April Showers
717.14-4021 Jun 69Musical Tour of the U.S.A.
723.14-462 Aug 69August 2, 1969
725.14-4816 Aug 69August 16, 1969
Season 15
730.15- 127 Sep 69September 27, 1969 - 15th Season
738.15- 925 Oct 69Halloween Show (1969)
740.15-118 Nov 69Veteran's Day Show
742.15-1322 Nov 69Thanksgiving (1969)
756.15-1720 Dec 69Christmas (1969)
765.15-2621 Feb 70Salute to Brotherhood Week (1970)
767.15-287 Mar 70March 7, 1970
768.15-2914 Mar 70St. Patrick's Day Celebration
769.15-3021 Mar 70Country and Western Show (1970)
770.15-3128 Mar 70Easter Show (1970)
771.15-324 Apr 70Academy Awards (1970)
775.15-362 May 70Kentucky Derby and Cinco de Mayo Celebration
776.15-379 May 70Mother's Day (1970)
777.15-3816 May 70Armed Forces Day (1970)
778.15-3923 May 70Vaudeville Days
780.15-4120 Jun 70Summertime (1970)
784.15-4518 Jul 70Gotta Travel On
785.15-461 Aug 70Songs from the Tropics
787.15-4715 Aug 70Summer End
789.15-4929 Aug 70Togetherness
Season 16
794.16- 510 Oct 70October 10, 1970
796.16- 724 Oct 70Musical Salute to Dixie
799.16-1114 Nov 70Big Band Era
800.16-1221 Nov 70Thanksgiving (1970)
804.16-1619 Dec 70Christmas Show (1970)
805.16-1726 Dec 70Rose Bowl (1970)
809.16-2123 Jan 71Tribute to Irving Berlin
811.16-236 Feb 71National Brotherhood Week
814.16-2627 Feb 71February 27, 1971
815.16-276 Mar 71Musical History Makers
817.16-2920 Mar 71Traditional Songs
818.16-3027 Mar 71Music From A to Z
819.16-313 Apr 71Academy Awards Show (1971)
820.16-3210 Apr 71Easter Show (1971)
821.16-3317 Apr 71National Secretaries Week
829.16-4112 Jun 71Everything's Coming Up Roses
830.16-4219 Jun 71Father's Day
832.16-4417 Jul 71California
833.16-4531 Jul 71A Salute to Summer
834.16-4614 Aug 71A Musical Smorgasbord
835.16-4728 Aug 71County Fair
836.16-484 Sep 71Say It With Music
Season 17 syndicated
838.17- 21-S-218 Sep 71School Days
839.17- 31-S-325 Sep 71Tribute to Vincent Youmans
840.17- 41-S-42 Oct 71The World
841.17- 51-S-59 Oct 71Riverboat Show (1971)
843.17- 71-S-723 Oct 71Fashion and Hits Through the Years
844.17- 81-S-830 Oct 71Halloween (1971)
845.17- 91-S-96 Nov 71Country and Western Show (1971)
847.17-111-S-1120 Nov 71Thanksgiving (1971)
848.17-121-S-1227 Nov 71Broadway Musicals
850.17-141-S-1411 Dec 71Farm Show
852.17-161-S-1625 Dec 71Christmas (1971)
853.17-171-S-171 Jan 72New Year's Day Show
855.17-191-S-1915 Jan 72Los Angeles
856.17-201-S-2022 Jan 72January 22, 1972
857.17-211-S-2129 Jan 72Songs of the 40's
858.17-221-S-225 Feb 72History of American Musical Entertainment
861.17-251-S-2526 Feb 72Meet Our Family - Spotlight on Talent
862.17-261-S-264 Mar 72Great Songs from 'Way Down South'
863.17-271-S-2711 Mar 72Songs of the Scintillating '60s
864.17-281-S-2818 Mar 72Big Band Memories
866.17-301-S-301 Apr 72The Easter Parade
868.17-321-S-3215 Apr 72Famous Resorts
877.17-431 Jul 72Movie Melodies
884.17-5026 Aug 72August 26, 1972
Season 18
885.18- 12-S-19 Sep 72Hawaii
889.18- 52-S-47 Oct 72Tribute to Harry Warren
890.18- 62-S-514 Oct 72Transportation
892.18- 82-S-728 Oct 72America, What It Used to Be
893.18- 92-S-84 Nov 72Tahoe Highlights
894.18-102-S-911 Nov 72Salute to George Gershwin
895.18-112-S-1018 Nov 72America, The Melting Pot (Thanksgiving)
897.18-132-S-122 Dec 72Country and Western Show
899.18-152-S-1416 Dec 72Childhood Memories
902.18-182-S-176 Jan 73Salute to Canada
903.18-192-S-1813 Jan 73Salute to Mexico
906.18-222-S-213 Feb 73Ecology (The World Around Us)
907.18-232-S-2210 Feb 73Themes from the Classics
910.18-262-S-253 Mar 73Happiness Is
912.18-282-S-2717 Mar 73The Bright Side of Life
914.18-302-S-2931 Mar 73American Pastimes
915.18-312-S-307 Apr 73Songs of the South
916.18-322-S-3114 Apr 73Salute to Irving Berlin
Season 19
917.19- 13-S-122 Sep 73We Can Make Music
918.19- 23-S-229 Sep 73Tribute to Walt Disney
919.19- 33-S-36 Oct 73Salute to Nat King Cole
921.19- 53-S-520 Oct 73Hometowns
922.19- 63-S-627 Oct 73Salute to Cole Porter
923.19- 73-S-73 Nov 73Salute to the Ladies
924.19- 83-S-810 Nov 73Mancini-Mercer
925.19- 93-S-917 Nov 73Thanksgiving Special
930.19-143-S-1422 Dec 73Christmas (1973)
931.19-153-S-1529 Dec 73New Year's Eve (1973)
932.19-163-S-165 Jan 74Musical Tour of Europe
934.19-183-S-1819 Jan 74Tribute to Glenn Miller
936.19-203-S-202 Feb 74Songs to Remember
940.19-243-S-242 Mar 74We Believe in Music
941.19-253-S-259 Mar 74Lawrence Welk's Golden Anniversary in Show Business
946.19-303-S-3013 Apr 74Don't Get Around Much Anymore
947.19-313-S-3120 Apr 74Western Heritage
948.19-323-S-3227 Apr 74Tribute to Famous Entertainers
Season 20
949.20- 14-S-17 Sep 74That's Entertainment
950.20- 24-S-214 Sep 74Number One Songs of the 70s
952.20- 44-S-428 Sep 74Favorite Love Songs
953.20- 54-S-55 Oct 74Best Selling Hits
954.20- 64-S-612 Oct 74Tribute to Duke Ellington
955.20- 74-S-719 Oct 74Salute to Famous Musical Families
959.20-114-S-1116 Nov 74Escondido Show
960.20-124-S-1223 Nov 74Tribute to the Fabulous Dorseys
963.20-154-S-1514 Dec 74Tribute to Walt Disney
964.20-164-S-1621 Dec 74Christmas
965.20-174-S-1728 Dec 74New Year's Show
966.20-184-S-184 Jan 75Those Were the Days
967.20-194-S-1911 Jan 75Salute to Jerome Kern
968.20-204-S-2018 Jan 75Tribute to Famous Girl Singers
969.20-214-S-2125 Jan 75This Colorful World
971.20-234-S-238 Feb 75Hooray for Hollywood
972.20-244-S-2415 Feb 75Tribute to the Sweet Bands
974.20-264-S-261 Mar 75Tribute to Irving Berlin (1975)
977.20-294-S-2922 Mar 75A Cavalcade of Musical Styles
979.20-314-S-315 Apr 75Famous Places
Season 21
980.21- 15-S-16 Sep 75Silver Anniversary
981.21- 25-S-213 Sep 75Harvest on the Farm
982.21- 35-S-320 Sep 75Salute to Male Singers
983.21- 45-S-427 Sep 75Best of the New Songs
984.21- 55-S-54 Oct 75Most Requested Songs
985.21- 65-S-611 Oct 75America's Wonderland
986.21- 75-S-718 Oct 75Musical Masterpieces
987.21- 85-S-825 Oct 75Halloween (1975)
988.21- 95-S-91 Nov 75America on the Move
991.21-125-S-1222 Nov 75Thanksgiving (1975)
993.21-145-S-146 Dec 75Lawrence Welk Family of Nations
995.21-165-S-1620 Dec 75Christmas
996.21-175-S-1727 Dec 75New Year's Show
997.21-185-S-183 Jan 76Strike Up the Band
998.21-195-S-1910 Jan 76Shall We Dance?
999.21-205-S-2017 Jan 76200 Years of American Music (1)
1000.21-21 5-S-2124 Jan 76<200 Years of American Music (2)
1001.21-22 5-S-2231 Jan 76
1002.21-23 5-S-237 Feb 76
1003.21-24 5-S-2414 Feb 76
1004.21-25 5-S-2521 Feb 76
1005.21-26 5-S-2628 Feb 76
1006.21-27 5-S-276 Mar 76
1008.21-29 5-S-2920 Mar 76
1011.21-32 5-S-3210 Apr 76
Season 22
1012.22-1 6-S-125 Sep 76
1013.22-2 6-S-22 Oct 76
1014.22-3 6-S-39 Oct 76
1016.22-5 6-S-523 Oct 76
1017.22-6 6-S-630 Oct 76
1023.22-12 6-S-1211 Dec 76
1024.22-13 6-S-1318 Dec 76
1025.22-14 6-S-1425 Dec 76
1027.22-17 6-S-178 Jan 77
1029.22-19 6-S-1822 Jan 77
1035.22-25 6-S-245 Mar 77
1036.22-26 6-S-2512 Mar 77
1039.22-29 6-S-282 Apr 77
1042.22-32 6-S-3123 Apr 77
1043.22-33 6-S-3230 Apr 77
Season 23
1046.23-3 7-S-31 Oct 77
1047.23-4 7-S-48 Oct 77
1048.23-5 7-S-515 Oct 77
1049.23-6 7-S-622 Oct 77
1050.23-7 7-S-729 Oct 77
1052.23-9 7-S-912 Nov 77
1053.23-10 7-S-1019 Nov 77
1054.23-11 7-S-1126 Nov 77
1056.23-13 7-S-1310 Dec 77
1060.23-17 7-S-177 Jan 78
1061.23-18 7-S-1814 Jan 78
1071.23-28 7-S-2825 Mar 78
1072.23-29 7-S-291 Apr 78
1074.23-31 7-S-3115 Apr 78
Season 24
1075.24-1 8-S-116 Sep 78
1076.24-2 8-S-223 Sep 78
1078.24-4 8-S-47 Oct 78
1079.24-5 8-S-514 Oct 78
1080.24-6 8-S-621 Oct 78
1081.24-7 8-S-728 Oct 78
1082.24-8 8-S-84 Nov 78
1083.24-9 8-S-911 Nov 78
1084.24-10 8-S-1018 Nov 78
1086.24-12 8-S-122 Dec 78
1089.24-15 8-S-1523 Dec 78
1090.24-16 8-S-1630 Dec 78
1093.24-19 8-S-1920 Jan 79
1098.24-24 8-S-2424 Feb 79
1101.24-27 8-S-2717 Mar 79
1103.24-29 8-S-2931 Mar 79
1105.24-31 8-S-3114 Apr 79
1106.24-32 8-S-3221 Apr 79
Season 25
1107.25-1 9-S-115 Sep 79
1108.25-2 9-S-222 Sep 79
1109.25-3 9-S-329 Sep 79
1110.25-4 9-S-46 Oct 79
1111.25-5 9-S-513 Oct 79
1113.25-7 9-S-727 Oct 79
1114.25-8 9-S-83 Nov 79
1115.25-9 9-S-910 Nov 79
1117.25-11 9-S-1124 Nov 79
1120.25-14 9-S-1415 Dec 79
1121.25-15 9-S-1522 Dec 79
1122.25-16 9-S-1629 Dec 79
1123.25-17 9-S-175 Jan 80
1124.25-18 9-S-1812 Jan 80
1126.25-20 9-S-2026 Jan 80
1127.25-21 9-S-212 Feb 80
1129.25-23 9-S-2316 Feb 80
1130.25-24 9-S-2423 Feb 80
1132.25-26 9-S-268 Mar 80
1133.25-27 9-S-2715 Mar 80<25th Anniversary Show
1135.25-29 9-S-2929 Mar 80
1136.25-30 9-S-305 Apr 80
1137.25-31 9-S-3112 Apr 80
1138.25-32 9-S-3219 Apr 80
Season 26
1139.26-1 10-S-113 Sep 80
1141.26-3 10-S-327 Sep 80
1142.26-4 10-S-44 Oct 80
1143.26-5 10-S-511 Oct 80
1145.26-7 10-S-725 Oct 80
1148.26-10 10-S-1015 Nov 80
1149.26-11 10-S-1122 Nov 80
1150.26-12 10-S-1229 Nov 80
1151.26-13 10-S-136 Dec 80
1152.26-14 10-S-1413 Dec 80
1153.26-15 10-S-1520 Dec 80
1156.26-18 10-S-1810 Jan 81
1157.26-19 10-S-1917 Jan 81
1158.26-20 10-S-2024 Jan 81
1159.26-21 10-S-2131 Jan 81
1160.26-22 10-S-227 Feb 81
1161.26-23 10-S-2314 Feb 81
1162.26-24 10-S-2421 Feb 81
1163.26-25 10-S-2528 Feb 81<200 Years of American Music
1165.26-27 10-S-2714 Mar 81
1168.26-30 10-S-304 Apr 81
1170.26-32 10-S-3218 Apr 81
Season 27
1171.27-1 11-S-112 Sep 81
1172.27-2 11-S-219 Sep 81
1173.27-3 11-S-326 Sep 81
1174.27-4 11-S-43 Oct 81
1175.27-5 11-S-510 Oct 81
1177.27-7 11-S-724 Oct 81
1179.27-9 11-S-97 Nov 81
1180.27-10 11-S-1014 Nov 81
1182.27-12 11-S-1228 Nov 81
1187.27-17 11-S-172 Jan 82
1188.27-18 11-S-189 Jan 82
1189.27-19 11-S-1916 Jan 82
1190.27-20 11-S-2023 Jan 82
1191.27-21 11-S-2130 Jan 82
1192.27-22 11-S-226 Feb 82
1193.27-23 11-S-2313 Feb 82
1194.27-24 11-S-2420 Feb 82
1195.27-25 11-S-2527 Feb 82
1196.27-26 11-S-266 Mar 82
1197.27-27 11-S-2713 Mar 82
1198.27-28 11-S-2820 Mar 82
1200.27-30 11-S-303 Apr 82
1201.27-31 11-S-3110 Apr 82
1202.27-32 11-S-3217 Apr 82
Special
S-3425 Dec 85Christmas Reunion

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lawrence welk show tv (35)

02-07-2020 · Instead of appearing only on local television, Dodge offered Welk a national show. ABC snatched up the program, and on this date in 1955, the first national broadcast of the Lawrence Welk show aired coast to coast. After a 27 years on national TV, Welk retired, but the show lived on, with re-runs becoming one of the most popular programs on PBS.

02-07-2020

After ten years playing at the Trianon Ballroom in Chicago, Lawrence Welk, native of Strasburg, North Dakota, realized that his days in the Windy City were drawing to a close. The big band craze of the 1930s and ’40s was ending, Welk’s crowds were dwindling, and the Trianon’s manager had refused repeated requests from the band for salary increases. And so, in 1950, Welk decided to pack up his orchestra and go on tour, hoping for more lucrative engagements.

Midway through the tour, Sam Lutz, the band’s manager, secured Welk his first big break. Lutz contacted KTLA, a Los Angeles television station, about airing Welk’s orchestra. The station manager was hesitant, having been burned by bands before. He finally agreed, but there was a catch. KTLA refused to pay any expenses, and even asked that Welk put up three hundred dollars to pay for shooting costs! Welk agreed, and his orchestra made its television debut on May 2 of 1951.

Fortunately, Welk’s on-air appearance was a complete success. The next morning while playing golf, he received many compliments and congratulations from complete strangers who had seen him on their television sets the night before. As for KTLA, it received numerous calls and letters asking to see more of Lawrence Welk. The station manager quickly informed Welk that he’d be happy to air his band the following week, and would even pay the band for its trouble.

The Lawrence Welk show grew into a successful weekly program in Los Angeles, attracting the interest of the Dodge Motor Company, which was looking for a local show to sponsor. The company sent a representative to discuss a sponsorship, but Welk rebuffed the overture, informing the Dodge agent that he was currently sponsored by Chevrolet. To this, the Dodge employee simply replied, “Oh, I think we just may get you in a Dodge one of these days.” One month later, the Dodge Motor Company and Mr. Welk signed an agreement giving Dodge exclusive sponsoring rights.

As the months passed, Welk’s show became even more successful. His ratings were high, and local Los Angeles Dodge dealerships were enjoying increased business. Welk’s success encouraged Dodge to reconsider its arrangement. Instead of appearing only on local television, Dodge offered Welk a national show. ABC snatched up the program, and on this date in 1955, the first national broadcast of the Lawrence Welk show aired coast to coast. After a 27 years on national TV, Welk retired, but the show lived on, with re-runs becoming one of the most popular programs on PBS.

Dakota Datebook written by Lane Sunwall

Sources:“50 Years on National Television: The Lawrence Welk Show,” North Dakota State University http://www.lib.ndsu.nodak.edu/grhc/history_culture/lawrence_welk/fifty_years.html (accessed June 11, 2008).“Lawrence Welk”, Oklahoma Educational Television Authority http://www.oeta.onenet.net/welk/welk.htm (accessed June 11, 2008).

Welk, Lawrence, and Bernice McGeehan. Wunnerful, Wunnerful: The Autobiography of Lawrence Welk. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1971.

lawrence welk show tv (36)

A holiday show features "There's No Place Like Home for the Holidays," "A House With Love in It," "Be Thankful," "Back in Your Own Backyard," "Baby Face" and "We Gather Together." ( 60 minutes ) Schedule. Channel. Audio. HD. Saturday, Nov. 20, 2021 @ 7:00PM ET. WNIT HDTV 34.1.

lawrence welk show tv (37)

  • A tribute to composer Hoagy Carmichael includes "Two Sleepy People," "Heart and Soul" and "Georgia on My Mind." (60 minutes)

    ScheduleChannelAudioHD
    WNIT HDTV 34.1 HD
    WNIT InFocus 34.2
    See our full program schedule.
  • Lawrence Welk reunites with his musical family for a program filled with traditional Christmas carols. (60 minutes)

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  • Happy holiday nostalgia abounds with "This Could Be the Start of Something Big," "Auld Lang Syne," a salute to the Rose Bowl and the Rose Parade, "I Could Have Danced All Night" and "Let's Start the New Year Right." (60 minutes)

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lawrence welk show tv (38)

The Lawrence Welk Show. was TV’s best party—until it wasn’t. For most of the history of television, the barrier to syndication—and to …

For most of the history of television, the barrier to syndication—and to profitability—has been 100 episodes. The shows that have made it to that mark are an unusual group. Many were big hits. Some found small cult audiences. Still others just hung on as best they could and never posted numbers quite low enough to be canceled. In 100 Episodes,we examine the shows that made it to that number, considering both how they advanced and reflected the medium and what contributed to their popularity.

For most of television’s first decade, it was something of a party. As the new gadget infiltrated American life, people visited the homes of neighbors who had purchased one of the machines to check out what it was capable of, and the programming that was most popular was often festive, designed to promote the idea of an audience as a community, and make those who watched the box not feel so alone. The medium was heavily indebted to the stage and to radio, and it borrowed many of its most persistent forms—the social-issues drama, the sitcom, the soap opera—from either or both.

Those forms exist to this day, though some are on their last legs. The social-issues drama, which TV took from the kitchen-sink stage dramas of the time, continues to pop up occasionally on the broadcast networks, and the health of the sitcom is in good shape (even if what we have now is a far cry from the radio-stage hybrid I Love Lucy). The soaps are dying, but at least they’re still around, too, some with ties back to the radio soap operas that gave them their name (thanks to the programs’ sponsorship by soap companies).

Yet just as many forms have died out. How many TV Westerns are there anymore? And what ever became of the variety show, with its multiple acts and wide variety of talented celebrities hauled before the cameras to sing and dance? Anthology dramas have also mostly disappeared. All of these forms will be resurrected every so often, but audiences seem mostly uninterested in them nowadays, even with their historical roots, and they’ll go back into TV’s attic until some new network president takes it upon him or herself to bring back a genre he or she loved as a child. (This seems to happen the most often with variety shows.)

The Lawrence Welk Show was a kind of variety show, but its real roots lay in the kinds of music programs that had been hugely popular on radio, for obvious reasons. Where something like The Ed Sullivan Show was dedicated to cramming as many different acts into one episode as possible, The Lawrence Welk Show aimed to re-create a particular kind of fun, an evening spent out on the town listening to inoffensive yet danceable music, then taking a swing out on the floor with a significant other. Welk’s big band had been carefully pulled together over his years touring and on the radio, and it was filled with the sorts of nice, Midwestern boys like Welk himself (a North Dakota native). The primary goal of the program was to make sure the music never stopped playing, and that it never got to be too much for the show’s predominantly older audience. And that audience was loyal, sticking with the program as it moved from a locally based Los Angeles show to a national one to one that ran in first-run syndication. Welk had a program on the air somewhere in the country from 1951 to 1982, a staggeringly long run that no other musical variety program can really touch. And he did it all without catering to changing whims or fashions, outside of the occasional badly misjudged musical number, such as this one:

Welk’s connections to radio were real. He’d begun his career on the national stage as a bandleader for South Dakota’s WNAX radio, a popular station that could be picked up all over the Midwest under the right conditions. Welk kept the affectations he’d learned growing up in the Dakotas his whole life, to the point where his program sometimes seemed like a small-town newspaper come to life. He’d almost always introduce the musicians on the show with their hometowns, and for many years, his Christmas show featured the members of his band hauling their kids up onstage to introduce themselves to the cameras. (In one version, a wailing baby threatens to drown everything out, but Welk plows right on through, an immovable smile on his face.) Welk hailed back to a day when entertainment was respectable, when the most out-there thing that might happen on television was expert accordionist Myron Floren (Welk’s right-hand man for the show’s entire run) ripping through “Lady Of Spain” while hunched over his instrument like a mad scientist coaxing life into it.

When Welk began his program as a local show in Los Angeles, he was courting an audience the networks were interested in. Early in its life, television was already being viewed with suspicion by those who feared it would turn into a platform for kiddie programming and shows of no use to adult viewers. The early ’50s were the great age of arts programming and live drama, as the networks toyed around with attracting a mass audience by appealing to their better natures, but it was also the age when game shows and the broad comedy of Milton Berle ruled the roost. Berle’s antics were often hilarious, but no one would mistake them for sophisticated, and some feared that television would become devoid of any cultural worth.

Now, it’s hard to look back at Welk’s show and read “cultural worth” into it, but as the bandleader’s audience consisted of those entering late middle age or elderly years, it was evident that no one would mistake this show for any of a number of programs aimed more at kids and teenagers. In the modern era, a TV series that attracted mainly elderly people would be ushered off the air, and it would never be conceived of as a program directed at that audience. Yet Welk specifically set out to attract a “mature” audience, and when ABC saw what he had accomplished with a Los Angeles program, he was given plumb positioning on the then-new network. He began his run there in 1955, and it concluded in 1971, at a time when the networks were finally purging themselves of programs aimed at older adults and pursuing the youth market more, a move that evolved into the current obsession with the 18- to 49-year-old demographic. Welk was impervious to cancellation, however, and he re-launched the program in first-run syndication, where he became a staple of many local stations, particularly PBS stations, for another 10 years, then even longer in syndicated reruns.

Welk didn’t want to challenge his audience, really, but he benefited from networks that wanted arts programming and thought he came close enough. What Welk wanted, most of all, was to present a good time, a fizzy party that would never end, filled with his light and bubbly Champagne Music. Watching the early episodes of The Lawrence Welk Show—before the series was overwhelmed by the cheesy musical skits that dominate the program in the public imagination—is watching a culture struggling to hold onto itself in the face of a coming youth movement. The songs are old. The dances are traditional. And every time a polka begins, someone swoops in from offstage to dance around and express the joy the audience will ideally be feeling in its heart. The Lawrence Welk Show just might be the most Midwestern program ever made, and it gave a national audience to the touring Midwestern dance bands that enlivened county fairs and local festivals.

Welk had a tremendous eye for talent. He launched the Lennon Sisters, who became one of the most popular recording acts of the period, and he gave the virtuosity of Floren center stage on numerous occasions. (The two would often duet, but Welk would let Floren have most of the big moments and flourishes, as he was simply a better player than Welk was.) In his second autobiography, Ah-One, Ah-Two! Life With My Musical Family, which he wrote in the wake of his immensely successful reimagining of the show as a syndicated series, Welk writes movingly and strangely about his “musical family,” the people he surrounded himself with who became band members and regular performers on the show. Welk seemed to want to be at once a boss and a father figure to these folks, and he writes at length about his disciplinary measures for those who weren’t on the show, which extended beyond workplace punishment and into the parental, or about how the women in his cast could usually sway him with tears, just like a doting dad might be swayed by his daughter crying. But Welk also was willing to take chances on just about anyone. In Ah-One, Ah-Two, he writes about auditioning those who came up to him on the spot, and he was the first variety-show host to employ a black performer regularly on his show, in tap dancer Arthur Duncan.

Yet his sense of Midwestern decency could cut both ways: Welk’s relentless pursuit of a safe space for his audience, those who felt increasingly left behind by the cultural shifts of the ’60s, essentially sutured it off from any cultural advances, turning it into a show that existed in a perpetual 1952, an age when big band was still the biggest music around, and everybody in pop culture was expected to behave a certain way. He made all of the show’s performers adhere to a strict moral code, and he famously fired “Champagne Girl” Alice Lon in 1959, with some sources claiming it was because she sat on a desk and crossed her legs. (Others argue Lon, a young mother, wanted too big of a raise.) He read fan mail intently, hoping to glean information on which performers audience members were and weren’t responding to, and he cut people from the show often without much of an explanation, simply because he felt they weren’t working out. This had the effect of keeping the safe world his audience liked intact, while simultaneously engendering a fierce loyalty to Welk from young performers who might otherwise be venturing into the music scene of the era. Indeed, many Welk performers married other Welk performers, and after a time, the whole show seemed to occupy an alternate universe from the increasingly youth-heavy Los Angeles it was taped in.

The Lawrence Welk Show did try to change with the times. It updated rock songs and folk hits in the big-band style, though it inevitably sanded any edges off the product, making everything from The Beatles to Burt Bacharach sound like The Lawrence Welk Band. The show attempted to build a bridge between the grandparents of America and their increasingly incomprehensible grandchildren, but it more often ended up in skits like the “One Toke Over The Line” number shown above, skits that seemed to utterly misunderstand what it was that the kids were up to nowadays. Welk wanted to make a show that stood for good, old-fashioned, Christian entertainment, but he also wanted to make a fun show, one that would get the folks at home up and dancing, just like the shows he used to play in the Midwest. Instead, he closed himself off more and more from the world at large, and ABC cut him loose in 1971.

In Ah-One, Ah-Two, Welk partially blames this on the attempts to play rock music; he says that on a tour after the cancellation, audiences around the country asked him to bring back a program where he performed “our music.” He writes:

“I began to realize that if I had put my foot down more firmly during the last year we appeared on ABC and insisted on playing the kind of music that was right for us—then we might never have lost our show. I think we got off the track when we encountered the massive trend toward rock and roll, and acid rock, during the late sixties. Trends are mysterious. They seem to come from nowhere, and they are often very hard to withstand—or understand!”

Yet, rock ’n’ roll was already the dominant cultural force in American musical culture, and it only became more so, before being supplanted by hip-hop (a musical form it’s hard to imagine Welk even beginning to fathom). Welk’s show ran for another 10 years, but what had begun as a sophisticated party, a hoped-for mark of maturity and intelligence, had become a program that marked itself as something only those who wished no engagement with modern culture would watch. Welk had successfully preserved “our music,” but he’d also closed himself off from everything else that was good and vital about modern culture. He held so firm to the initial impetus for his hiring that he was unable to evolve. What had been relevant became laughably irrelevant, and the only people dancing at the party were ghosts.

Next time: A Different World

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03-02-1991 · The Dodge people saw this show, fell in love with it, and asked to sponsor it as “Lawrence Welk’s Dodge Dancing Party.” So we created a second network program, starting in …

03-02-1991

In 1955, Goldenson found another prime-time prospect on ABC’s Los Angeles affiliate, KABC-TV.

Lawrence Welk, another of our early shows, was phenomenally successful in a way that has never been duplicated. He and his band established themselves performing live at the LaMonica Ball Room in Santa Monica. Our Los Angeles station, KABC-TV, put him on the air locally at 9 Saturday night. In the summer of 1955 we picked this up for the network.

The Dodge people saw this show, fell in love with it, and asked to sponsor it as “Lawrence Welk’s Dodge Dancing Party.” So we created a second network program, starting in the fall of 1956. “Lawrence Welk’s Top Tunes and New Talent,” aired at 9:30 Monday night. That show ran through the fall of 1957.

I don’t believe there’s ever been another individual with musical variety shows on a network two nights a week.

It couldn’t go on forever, of course. In the middle of 1960 Dodge suddenly decided they wanted a change. The program had outlived Dodge’s interests in it. Welk was very upset. He had been with them so long that he felt like they’d taken away his life.

Then I got a call from Matty Rosenhaus of J.B. Williams Co., the makers of Geritol. He said he’d asked Welk if Geritol could sponsor his show, and Welk turned him down. Welk said he didn’t know the product, and he wasn’t going to allow himself to promote anything he didn’t have confidence in. I haven’t heard that kind of television talk in a long time.

(Video) Lawrence Welk Show - "Great Entertainers" - 1981 - Complete HD

I called Welk. I said, “I want to come out and see you. Matty Rosenhaus is a very upright man. I’ve known him for years, and I think you should consider accepting his product.”

Matty flew out from New York, and the three of us spent several hours together. Matty brought some samples and showed him that Geritol was mostly vitamins, including iron. The very worst thing you could say about it was that it was like chicken soup--it couldn’t hurt you. But more important, Welk had a chance to see Matty wasn’t a phony.

In the end Welk said he was assured Matty was of good character and that Geritol was perfectly proper. We shook hands on a deal.

From the time J.B. Williams began sponsoring part of “The Lawrence Welk Show,” Geritol became a household word. When we changed our network strategy to go after younger audiences, we took Welk off the air, in 1971, even though he had 16 years of solid ratings. Welk went into syndication for another dozen years. Geritol sponsored him till the end.

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Lawrence Welk (March 11, 1903 – May 17, 1992) was a popular Big Band orchestra leader best known for The Lawrence Welk Show, a variety and music program broadcast on American television for thirty-one years.. Born in rural North Dakota to German-speaking immigrants from Russia, Welk began his career as the accordion-playing frontman to a big band that toured the …

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A-one, and-a-two...

"For a while we had trouble trying to get the sound of a champagne cork exploding out of the bottle. I solved the problem by sticking my finger in my mouth and popping it out."

Lawrence Welk

Lawrence Welk (March 11, 1903 – May 17, 1992) was a popular Big Band orchestra leader best known for The Lawrence Welk Show, a variety and music program broadcast on American television for thirty-one years.

Born in rural North Dakota to German-speaking immigrants from Russia, Welk began his career as the accordion-playing frontman to a big band that toured the US back in the 1930s. During a stop in Pittsburgh he found himself the owner of a bubble machine, which he cannily turned into his band's trademark - "champagne music", he called it, and his female singer was dubbed the "Champagne Lady". After World War II he settled in California and, in 1951, began his television career with a one-hour show on KTLA. The Lawrence Welk Show, filmed at the Aragon Ballroom in Venice Beach, gained a devoted audience who loved his conservative musical tastes and quirky use of the English language, and was soon picked up by the network.

Right from the beginning he found himself the target of satirists such as Stan Freberg, whose ferocious sendup of the bandleader hurt him. (Freberg parodied Welk's poor English using the phrase "wunnerful, wunnerful", which Welk denied he'd ever said. Years later, though, he used it as the title of his autobiography.) He was later parodied in MAD magazine and on Saturday Night Live and SCTV.

Although audiences knew him as the fatherly host with a quirky grasp of the language, he could be a stern taskmaster when dealing with performers. He famously fired one Champagne Lady for "showing too much leg", only relenting when fan mail poured in supporting the singer (whose offending outfit had been ridiculously modest even for the time). He also spent many years in a battle royale with the father/agent of the Lennon Sisters; Welk wanted to pay them as a single act, whereas Mr. Lennon insisted they be paid as individuals. The Lennons won, but only because Welk felt immense guilt over one of the sisters acquiring an unstable stalker after her appearances on the show. (The stalker, believing himself to be Peggy Lennon's rightful husband, would eventually murder the father, which became another source of guilt for Welk and caused him to feel as if he was in loco parentis in some form for the girls.)

Tastes in popular music changed, but Welk's show and his didn't; corny and quaint even by the standards of The '50s, Welk kept his eponymous show on the straight and very narrow through the Sixties and Seventies and well into the Eighties, long past the time of rock and rebellion. His interpretation of "old-fashioned modesty" could sometimes seem outlandish even to a conservative of the time; when the Lennon sisters began having families of their own, he devised bizarre stage sets to hide their lower bodies (behind fences, prams, kitchen counters, etc.) to prevent the audience from seeing that these devout Catholic married women were pregnant. The only black people to appear on the show were tap dancers, a fact decried by both blacks and whites at the time. (Gregory Hines later pointed out, though, that the Welk show was the only place on television where tap was shown at all.)

It was a popular belief in the 1970s that Welk was a "phony" — that his entire persona, including his difficulties with English and his apparent social conservatism, was a calculated ruse. Much of this belief arose from Welk's wavering accent, which seemed to be stronger on the show than in interviews, and his varying answers about his family's heritage. In reality Welk started out with a very strong accent and a poor grasp of English idiom, as his parents didn't speak English and his record at school (the only place he had heard English as a child) was spotty to poor. Stan Freberg's satire stung him into hiring an English tutor, but he soon found that his audience didn't want him to speak well; they preferred his old accent, so he "forgot" his lessons while on the air. As for his ancestry, it was difficult at the time for any performer to admit that his parents had immigrated from Russia, even if they were (like Welk's) Volgadeutsch who had left decades before the Revolution. Like many other actors and musicians, he prevaricated and said instead that his ancestors came from Alsace, which (if one went back far enough) was strictly true.

Although his own accordion skills were considered weak, Welk was adept at recognizing talent in other musicians and (unlike his treatment of singers) he didn't mind paying for it. Pete Fountain and Johnny Hodges were among the many instrumentalists who spent a good portion of their career in Welk's band. That said, Welk could be so clueless about contemporary rock music that he once arranged a cover of the drug song, "One Toke Over the Line," by the folk rock duo, Brewer & Shipley, played on his show because he thought it was a spiritual piece. Gregory Hines also credited Welk's show for his own interest in tap dancing and jazz music, admitting in an interview that he would "secretly" watch the show when his grandma had it on, hoping that his friends wouldn't know that he wasn't just an unwilling viewer.

The Lawrence Welk Show finally went off the air in 1982 due to Welk's own declining health. His investments in real estate and music publishing made him one of the wealthiest men on television by the time he retired. By the time he died in 1992 he was also the owner of numerous "resort communities", one of which he lived in; after his death, his band moved to Branson, Missouri, eventually opening the Lawrence Welk Theater there. And even today, some PBS stations show reruns of The Lawrence Welk Show.

  • Long-Runners: 31 years on Television, 51 years as a band leader, outlasting all the better known Big Band acts on the 30s and 40s.

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The Lawrence Welk Show cast list, including photos of the actors when available. Lawrence Welk (March 11, 1903 â May 17, 1992) was an American musician, accordionist, bandleader, and television impresario, who hosted the television program The Lawrence Welk Show from 1951 to 1982. Bobby was very friendly, wholesome, dedicated to his dancing.

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Singer was featured on the hit show for 25 years Joe Feeney, a Nebraska-born tenor who crooned "Danny Boy" and other standards for 25 years on "The Lawrence Welk Show… His style came to be known to his large audience of radio, television, and live-performance fans (and critics) as "champagne music". The Lawrence Welk Show did try to change with the times. Indeed, many Welk performers married other Welk performers, and after a time, the whole show seemed to occupy an alternate universe from the increasingly youth-heavy Los Angeles it was taped in. Over 100 biographies from the Lawrence Welk Show. At the Champagne Theatre in Branson, Missouri, 47 alumnae of The Lawrence Welk Show (1955) reunite for an evening of song and dance. Quotation: "And a-one, and a-two." The Lawrence Welk Show is available for streaming on American Pop … Welk fired Alice Lon, the original Champagne Lady, in 1959--on-air--for crossing her legs on a desk during a number. After Elsie Hobson died in 2001, James met actress, singer and writer Ashley Aarons. 1931–1992 his death). He was 69. How they got hired, why they got fired, why they left, where they are now.Singers, dancers and band biographies. The Lawrence Welk Show (1955–1982) Series Cast & Crew. 5/17/1992 Age: 89 Cause of death: pneumonia Full name: Lawrence Welk ... pomoc.nvitamin.si With Daphne Zuniga, Sheila Aldridge, Sherry Aldridge, Ron Anderson. He also hosted two of the weekly Welk show rebroadcasts on PBS, which feature new 10- to 12-minute segments wrapped around the old programs. Lawrence Welk (March 11, 1903 – May 17, 1992) was an American musician, accordionist, Welk collaborated with Western artist Red Foley to record a version of Spade Cooley's "Shame on You" in 1945. hit "The Wah-Watusi" with the bass singer Larry Hooper wearing a beatnik outfit. Musical Performers Solo artists and groups, singers and instrumentalists, from a variety of genres. Lawrence Welk Dead Born: 3/11/1903 in Strasburg, North Dakota, USA Died: 5/17/1992 Age: 89 Cause of death: pneumonia Full name: Lawrence Welk Noted For: accordianist, bandleader, host, "The Lawrence Welk Show" (1955-82). He was featured weekly on dixieland and big band numbers, often in the company of Bob Havens (trombone), Don Bonnee or Mahlon Clark (clarinet), Russ Klein (tenor) and Frank Scott (piano). THE CHAMPAGNE MUSIC MAKERS: LAWRENCE WELK bandleader and host was born in Strasburg, North Dakota on March 11, 1903. Larry Hooper died of TEENney failure in 1983. This list includes all of the The Lawrence Welk Show main actors and actresses, so if they are an integral part of the show you'll find them below.You can various bits of trivia about these The Lawrence Welk Show stars, such as where the actor was born and what their year of birth is. Welk's 'champagne music' made for one of TV's most beloved series, first running on ABC from 1955 to 1971, then bubbling along in syndication until 1982. The "Stars of the Lawrence Welk Show" appeared there. Children, 3. Lawrence Welk Female Singers . In 1962, Cathcart joined the Lawrence Welk show. Lawrence Welk Net Worth: Lawrence Welk was an American musician, bandleader, and television personality who had a net worth of $8 million. The Lawrence Welk Show cast list, including photos of the actors when available. If we get started on the … Lawrence Welk's Son's Death . Bobby Burgess performs with all three of his dancing partners, Barbara Boylan, Cissy King and Elaine Balden. Lawrence Welk Deceased Cast Members The Lawrence Welk show had a large cast with musicians, singers, and dancers. 1931–1992 his death). Beginning in 1946, he began doing a lot of session work with Bing Crosby including appearances on his TV show. ABC put "The Lawrence Welk Show" on the air July 2, 1955. list deceased members of lawrence welk show. He accused her of "showing too much knee" and said he didn't tolerate "cheesecake" on his show. Lawrence Welk Show Cast. Athletes & Sports Figures And Tom stood out. The Lawrence Welk Show: Ava Barber, Lynn Anderson, Norma Zimmer, Lawrence Welk, Joe Feeney, Tom Netherton, Guy Hovis, Bobby Burgess The real story behind Cissy King and Natalie Nevins leaving the Show. TV show casts and stars of the silver screen. In recent years, Cuesta was one of the most popular of the featured performers at the Welk Resorts in Branson, Mo., and San Diego, and for the past few years he toured with "The Live Lawrence Welk Show." Complete song listing of Lawrence Welk on OLDIES.com Lawrence Welk ~ Songs List | OLDIES.com COVID-19: Because of processes designed to ensure the safety of our employees, you may experience a delay in the shipping of your order. Dick Cathcart, who provided the trumpet riffs for the 1955 film "Pete Kelly's Blues" and later played with the "Lawrence Welk Show" band, died on Monday. Lawrence Welk Cast Who Have Died . Aug 6, 2016. In 1951, Welk settled in Los Angeles. Where do I stream The Lawrence Welk Show online? Lawrence Welk Wikipedia 2020. Lawrence Welk Biography. She was often referred to as "Queen of the Honky-Tonk Piano" by Lawrence Welk himself. I got friendly with Cissy, Bobby and Tom. Over 60 years on TV! Welk was best known for hosting The Lawrence Welk Show from 1951 to 1982. The show became a Saturday night institution for many Americans. Our most popular category! Lawrence Welk Cast Still Living . Deceased Members Lawrence Welk Show . Children, 3. Jan 27, 2013 - SECOND PAGE TO WUNNERFUL PAST Sally Flynn and Clay Hart Lawrence Welk (March 11, 1903 – May 17, 1992) was an American musician, accordionist, One of his sons, Lawrence Welk Jr., married fellow Lawrence Welk Show performer Tanya Falan; they later This list includes all of the The Lawrence Welk Show main actors and actresses, so if they are an integral part of the show you'll find them below.You can various bits of trivia about these The Lawrence Welk Show stars, such as where the actor was born and what their year of birth is. Lawrence Welk Cast Death List . Interviews with living members. In watching all the re-runs of Lawrence Welk I appreciate that show a whole lot more then i did in my teens and early 20's. The series first aired on July 2, 1955. Lawrence Welk Members Passed Away . Political Figures U.S. Presidents, Cabinet, Congress, Supreme Court, state & local, world. Here is a Project I just set up for Lawrence Welk and his performers to help organize our search.. Should we focus on deceased stars or are living cast members famous enough. The group became an instant sensation, and Welk booked them as regulars on his show, where they performed every Saturday night for more than 13 years. The Lawrence Welk Show is a series that is currently running and has 1 seasons (22 episodes). Jo Ann Castle (born September 3, 1939) is an American honky-tonk pianist, best remembered for appearing on The Lawrence Welk Show. Myron Floren, Guy & Ralna (kept to themselves), Cissy King and Bobby Burgess and Tom Netherton. Lawrence Welk Deceased Cast Members. He became director of "The Lawrence Welk Show" in 1955 and in 1962 became the producer/director of the Welk show until his retirement in 1986. The Lawrence Welk Show Cast List … The Lennon Sisters, a harmonic quartet of siblings, made their debut appearance on "The Lawrence Welk Show" on Dec. 24, 1955, with an a cappella version of the song "He." A massive fan campaign ensued to bring her back; Welk … Directed by Dennis Glore. Ratings started low the first week, but quickly zoomed upwards. They were great. PBS Show Information. Lawrence Welk was on TV from 1955 to 1982 plus a lot of specials afterwards PBS once or twice a week. The Lawrence Welk Show cast list, including photos of the actors when available. Lawrence Welk (March 11, 1903 – May 17, 1992) was an American musician, accordionist, bandleader, and television impresario, who hosted the television program The Lawrence Welk Show from 1951 to 1982. Bobby was very friendly, wholesome, dedicated to his dancing. Lawrence Welk was born in Strasburg, North Dakota in March 1903 and passed away in May 1992. The Lawrence Welk Show (TV Series 1955–1982) cast and crew credits, including actors, actresses, directors, writers and more. Directed by (4) Writing credits (1) Cast (353) Produced by (10) Cinematography by (2) Film Editing by (4) Art Direction by (7) Set Decoration by (1) Costume Design by (1) Makeup Department (13) Production Management (13)

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In fact this episode never aired at all. Lawrence Welk was a "local" personality at the time, and this pilot was produced to pitch the show to the national networks (the Dodge commercials date from different years, they could not have AIRED in the same program together. Note that one of them is for the 1954 model year while another is for a ...

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Since 1987, more than 2.5 million fans of the longest-running, weekly-syndicated music/variety series have been tuning in each week to their PBS station to watch Lawrence Welk and their favorite "Musical Family" members sing and dance. The Lawrence Welk Show was first broadcast in 1951 on KTLA in Los Angeles. In 1955, the ABC network picked it ...

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This trip down memory lane features the first ever national television broadacst of The Lawrence Welk Show.

A major television milestone will be reached Saturday, September 3rd when The Lawrence Welk Show celebrates the beginning of 25 years of Champagne Music on public television. That evening you'll have have the opportunity to see the 1955 premiere episode of The Lawrence Welk Show. The Lawrence Welk Show "Say It With Music" airs Saturday, September 3 at 7 p.m. on WXXI-TV/HD (DT21.1/cable 11/cable 1011).  The program includes Alice Lon singing "Love Me Or Leave Me", while Larry Hooper delights with his signature song "Oh Happy Day", Rocky Rockwell charms us with "I Love Girls", and since it wouldn't be a Welk show without a polka, "The Clarinet Polka" fits the bill perfectly.Since 1987, more than 2.5 million fans of the longest-running, weekly-syndicated music/variety series have been tuning in each week to their PBS station to watch Lawrence Welk and their favorite "Musical Family" members sing and dance.

The Lawrence Welk Show was first broadcast in 1951 on KTLA in Los Angeles. In 1955, the ABC network picked it up for national broadcast. When ABC dropped the series in 1971 after running successfully for 16 years, Welk persevered by forming his own production company and began syndicating it directly to commercial stations individually. It stayed on the air in weekly national syndication until1982, often reappearing each December with new Christmas specials until 1985.

In 1987, after PBS funded and aired a very successful fund-raising special, Lawrence Welk: Television's Music Man, Robert L. "Bob" Allen, then the executive director of the statewide PBS affiliate OETA-The Oklahoma Network, formed a partnership with Welk Syndication and began offering the weekly series to public television stations.

Welk's mature audience, Allen said, was suited for non-commercial public television. "Commercial stations weren't interested in the older demographic because that group is set in their purchasing preferences. They're not likely to change even their toothpaste. But on the other hand, they're more likely to donate money to support their interests, he said. "And once they make a pledge to public television, they fulfill it and they've been fiercely loyal to 'The Lawrence Welk Show' for a record 25 years." "My father was very successful with his ideas and vision," his son Larry Welk said. "He had wonderful gut feelings for certain things and he knew what viewers wanted to hear and he made sure they played and sang that kind of music each week. He hired fabulous musicians and wonderful singers and dancers. I think that's why the show is still on the air and still so popular with the fans."Ralna English, longtime singer on the Welk show, recalls talking with Welk about their tough times and his upbeat attitude." He had a career long before he came on TV. He came up performing in small venues and worked hard," she said. "But he was always positive. I never knew him to be negative. He always looked to the bright side."

(Video) Lawrence Welk Show - "Broadway Musicals" - 1974 - Complete HD

Encores of the weekly TV show, garnered from more than 1,000 episodes taped between 1955 and 1982, are now hosted by Welk Stars Mary Lou Metzger and Bobby Burgess and are broadcast on more than 270 public television stations.

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Videos

1. Lawrence Welk Show - "Salute to the Swing Bands" - 1979
(Lawrence Welk Show Fans)
2. Lawrence Welk Show - "New Year" - 1966 - Complete HD
(Lawrence Welk Show Fans)
3. Lawrence Welk Show - "Vacation Songs" - 1967 - Complete HD
(Lawrence Welk Show Fans)
4. Lawrence Welk PBS Special - "Milestones and Memories (A Musical Family Reunion)" - 2001
(Lawrence Welk Show Fans)
5. Lawrence Welk Show - "Songs from the Movies" - 1980 - Complete HD
(Lawrence Welk Show Fans)
6. Lawrence Welk - "God Bless America" - PBS Special (2003)
(Lawrence Welk Show Fans)

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